Skip Navigation LinksHome > March 25, 2014 - Volume 36 - Issue 6 > $11.3 Million Thyroid Cancer SPORE Grant to OSU
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Oncology Times:
doi: 10.1097/01.COT.0000445631.79416.a9
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$11.3 Million Thyroid Cancer SPORE Grant to OSU

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The National Cancer Institute has awarded an $11.3 million Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant to Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center–Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute for a project to study and treat thyroid cancer, as well as for a collaborative project with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. This grant follows the NCI's renewal last year of a five-year, $11.3 million Program Project Grant to fund thyroid cancer research that researchers there had begun in 2008 (OT 10/25/13 issue).

“Thyroid cancer incidence rates are rising faster than for all cancers in the United States, making it the fifth most common malignancy in women and 11th most common in men,” the grant's principal investigator, Matthew D. Ringel, MD, Co-director of the Thyroid Cancer Unit, Director of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, and member of the Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics Program at OSUCCC–James, said in a news release. “Determining predisposing factors for thyroid cancer, reducing the side effects of treatments, and developing better therapies and biomarkers for those patients with aggressive tumors are all challenges in the treatment of this disease.”

MATTHEW D. RINGEL, MD, PI
MATTHEW D. RINGEL, MD, PI
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SPORE grants focus on clinical and/or translational science, supporting projects expected to result in new and diverse approaches to prevention, early detection, and treatment. In addition to providing funding for the continuation of four distinct research projects and shared research cores, the new funding will also support a career development program and a pilot research grant initiative.

“Our goal,” Ringel said via email about the ongoing projects, “is to identify new risk predictors of developing thyroid cancer, new diagnostic tools, and new treatments for patients.”

Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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