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Sports Nutrition Myths That Deserve to Die but Live On

Rosenbloom, Christine PhD, RDN, CSSD, FAND

doi: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000205
Continuing Education

Sports nutrition research and the practical applications of the research are ever changing and evolving. However, some myths remain widespread in the athletic community. Coaches, trainers, and athletes often cling to outdated information, which can harm performance and health. Three sports nutrition myths that are addressed in this article surround carbohydrate intake before exercise, treatment for muscle cramps, and quantity of dietary protein needed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis.Each myth will be given historical context, and this article showcases newer research to dispel the myth. Moreover, for each myth, a researcher with expertise in the content area will provide the “bottom line” for practitioners for communicating to athletes.

Christine Rosenbloom, PhD, RDN, CSSD, FAND, is professor emerita of nutrition at Georgia State University. She currently consults with athletes of all ages through her business, Chris Rosenbloom Food and Nutrition Services, LLC. She is editor-in-chief of Sports Nutrition: A Manual for Professionals (5th edition, 2012) published by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a regular contributor to USA Swimming.

Dr Rosenbloom is on the Sports Nutrition Board of Advisors for Clif Bar & Company and is a consultant with The Ginger Network, a marketing communications firm. She has disclosed a past financial relationship with the Gatorade Sports Science Institute and had held a webinar for the Avocado Board of California. This article has been reviewed and all potential or actual conflicts have been resolved.

Correspondence: Christine Rosenbloom, PhD, RDN, CSSD, FAND, 179 Honeysuckle Ln, Hartwell, GA 30643 (chrisrosenbloom@gmail.com).

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