Low-Income Shoppers and Fruit and Vegetables: What Do They Think?

Huang, Yancui MS; Edirisinghe, Indika PhD; Burton-Freeman, Britt M. PhD, MS

doi: 10.1097/NT.0000000000000176
Food and Nutrition

We surveyed 510 low-income shoppers to learn about their attitudes about organic and conventional fruits and vegetables (FV) and what would happen if we provided them with information about organic and conventional growing practices from a variety of sources. In general, participants preferred organic FV; however, cost was a significant barrier to purchase them. Informational statements about organic and conventional FV did not increase participants' likelihood to purchase more FV. In contrast, messages naming specific FV with pesticides shifted participants toward “less likely” to purchase any type of FV regardless whether organically or conventionally grown. The results provide insight about how low-income people view FV and how communications may influence their purchase intention.

Yancui Huang, MS, Center for Nutrition Research, Institute for Food Safety and Health, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

Indika Edirisinghe, PhD, Center for Nutrition Research, Institute for Food Safety and Health, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

Britt M. Burton-Freeman, PhD, MS, Center for Nutrition Research, Institute for Food Safety and Health, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago; and Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis.

This proposed study was funded by various donors, including a gift from the Alliance for Food and Farming.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Correspondence: Britt M. Burton-Freeman, PhD, MS, Center for Nutrition Research, Institute for Food Safety and Health, Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W 35th St, Ste 3D6-1, Chicago, IL 60616 (bburton@iit.edu).

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