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Hydration and Health Promotion

Kolasa, Kathryn M. PhD, RD, LDN; Lackey, Carolyn J. PhD; Grandjean, Ann C. EdD, FACSM

doi: 10.1097/NT.0b013e3181b9c970
Continuing Education

While the relation between hydration status and physical activity (military operations, sports performance) has been an area of extensive research, more recently, researchers have begun examining the relation between hydration status and health, acute and chronic diseases, and cognitive performance. On November 29 and 30, 2006, the International Life Sciences Institute North America Technical Committee on Hydration organized a conference on hydration and health promotion. This article is an overview of that conference.

A splendid review of what fluids can do

Kathryn M. Kolasa, PhD, RD, LDN, is a professor at the Departments of Family Medicine and of Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, and teaches evidence-based nutrition to medical students, residents, practicing physicians, and allied health professionals. She has studied the messages health professionals provide to their clients about water and hydration. She has been active in developing policies for ensuring that schoolchildren and workers have access to healthy food and beverage options.

Carolyn J. Lackey, PhD, is a professor and a food and nutrition specialist, Emerti at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. Her career has focused on translating nutrition and food science into appropriate consumer messages.

Ann C. Grandjean, EdD, FACSM, is the executive director of the Center for Human Nutrition, a nonprofit organization committed to the enhancement of human health, performance, and quality of life through better nutrition. As executive director of Center for Human Nutrition, she is responsible for the center's research and community services divisions. Dr Grandjean is also a clinical assistant professor in internal medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.

The conference in November 2006 and this summary article were organized by the North American branch of the International Life Sciences Institute North America Technical Committee on Hydration and were supported in part by educational grants from Campbell Soup Company, the Coca-Cola Company, Danone Group, Dr Pepper/Snapple Group, the Gatorade Company, Kraft Foods, and Nestle USA. At the conference, nonindustry speakers were reimbursed for their travel expenses and offered a small honorarium for their participation and preparation of a manuscript. In addition, the authors of this summary article were paid for some of their time in preparing and editing the manuscript. Conference Sponsor. The North American branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) is a public, nonprofit scientific foundation. Its Hydration Committee was established in 2001 to advance the understanding and application of scientific issues related to hydration. The committee supported the workshop and the development of this article. The ILSI North America, a public, nonprofit scientific foundation, advances the understanding and application of scientific issues related to the nutritional quality and safety of the food supply. The organization carries out its mission by sponsoring relevant research programs; professional education programs; and workshops, seminars, and publications, as well as providing a neutral forum for government, academic, and industry scientists to discuss and resolve scientific issues of common concern for the well-being of the general public. The ILSI North America's programs are supported primarily by its industry membership.

Workshop speakers and panelists included Lawrence Armstrong, Maxime Buyckx, Sheila Campbell, Victor Fulgoni, Ann Grandjean, Kathryn Kolasa, Robert Kenefick, Florian Lang, Harris Lieberman, Friedrich Manz, Ron Maughan, Bob Murray, Irv Rosenberg, and Rick Sharp.

Corresponding author: Kathryn M. Kolasa, PhD, RD, LDN, Department of Family Medicine and of Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, 600 Moye Blvd, Suite 4N-70, Greenville, NC 27834 (kolaska@ecu.edu).

© 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.