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Building Empowering Work Environments That Foster Civility And Organizational Trust: Testing an Intervention

Spence Laschinger, Heather K.; Leiter, Michael P.; Day, Arla; Gilin-Oore, Debra; Mackinnon, Sean P.

Nursing Research:
doi: 10.1097/NNR.0b013e318265a58d
Features
Abstract

Background: Creating supportive and empowering workplace conditions is important, not only because these conditions are related to improved nurse health and well-being but also because they are important for retaining top performing nurses. The current nursing shortage emphasizes the need to create such conditions.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a workplace intervention (Civility, Respect, and Engagement in the Workplace [CREW]) on nurses’ empowerment, experiences of supervisor and coworker incivility, and trust in nursing management.

Methods: Registered nurses (Time 1, n = 755; Time 2, n = 573) working in 41 units across five hospitals in two provinces completed measures of workplace empowerment, supervisor and coworker incivility, and trust in management before and after a 6-month intervention. Eight units participated in the intervention, and 33 units were control groups. Multilevel modeling was used to test the impact of the intervention.

Results: A significant interaction of time by intervention was found for the access to support and resources empowerment structures, total empowerment, supervisor incivility, and trust in management.

Discussion: Compared with the control group, nurses who experienced the intervention program reported significant improvements in empowerment, supervisor incivility, and trust in management. Despite methodological challenges experienced in this study, the CREW process appears to be a promising intervention approach to enhance quality of nursing work environments, which may contribute to the retention of the nursing workforce.

Author Information

Heather K. Spence Laschinger, PhD, RN, FAAN, FCAHS, is Distinguished University Professor and Arthur Labatt Family Nursing Research Chair in Health Human Resources Optimization, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

Michael P. Leiter, PhD, is Professor, Canada Research Chair in Organizational Health and Wellbeing, Centre for Organizational Research and Development, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia.

Arla Day, PhD, is Professor, Canada Research Chair in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Debra Gilin-Oore, PhD, is Professor, Department of Psychology, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Sean P. Mackinnon, BA, MA, is PhD Student, Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.nursingresearchonline.com).

Accepted for publication May 30, 2012.

This research was supported by funding by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, the Ontario Ministry of Health, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Corresponding author: Heather K. Spence Laschinger, PhD, RN, FAAN, FCAHS, Health Human Resources Optimization, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C1 (e-mail: hkl@uwo.ca).

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.