Nursing made Incredibly Easy

Skip Navigation LinksHome > Blogs > Incredibly Easy blog
Incredibly Easy blog
The Incredibly Easy blog will expand on selected topics presented in the print journal.
Tuesday, November 29, 2016

​I've been researching for an article on hospital-acquired infections recently and, as always, it caused me to reflect on my own practice. It's important as healthcare practitioners to keep up to date on the organisms we're dealing with so we can protect our patients and ourselves. Hospital-acquired infections and drug-resistant organisms are a primary cause of increased length of stay, morbidity, and mortality. Infection prevention techniques and processes, real-time data collection and monitoring, and vigilance in following recommendations and safety precautions are crucial tools in our fight against poor quality outcomes. Are you doing your part? Reflect on your current practice. And look for an article on multidrug-resistant organisms coming up in the January/February 2017 issue of Nursing made Incredibly Easy!

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.


Monday, November 21, 2016

​Watching the news, scanning journals, and reading other healthcare blogs, I’m increasingly concerned about the future of healthcare reform. Healthcare reform has been, and will remain, at the forefront of any political agenda and a major budgetary priority. With a new presidency on the horizon, I can’t help but wonder what this will mean for our current healthcare system and structure. I’m certain that the nursing shortage will persist, pay-for-performance will endure, and safe staffing will continue to be a top priority and challenge. Our healthcare leaders must stay vigilant, become flexible in thought, and keep abreast of legislative changes to help their organizations survive. Budgets will become tighter while demands increase, and nursing will remain at the front of it all, fighting for safety and advocating for our patients. What are your concerns and hopes as we move forward?

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Changing culture is a huge undertaking and one that isn’t for the faint of heart. You must be dedicated, determined, and have a tough skin to assist in such a transition. I’m curious about your experiences with changing a top-down hierarchy to a shared governance structure that empowers all organizational levels. The point-of-care team may be resistant to change, unengaged, and may want things to stay “as they are.” The managers and middle line may be reluctant to hand over power and decision making. Those in the upper levels may lack a sense of trust that it will work and meet important quality measures and performance indicators. There’s also a tendency for some to simply be micromanagers and resist true transformation. Does your organization utilize a shared governance model? What’s your administrative support like? Is your organization seeking Magnet® recognition or Baldrige certification? Are clinical staff members empowered to speak up, participate in decisions, provide input into needs assessment, and sit on committees? Tell us where you’re at in your journey!

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
I’ve continued my focus on nurses’ health this week, working on some research about addiction and nursing. As a nurse manager, I’ve worked in several states at different facilities where I’ve seen nurses of all ages, backgrounds, health status, education levels, and positions fall into addiction. It saddens me each time I encounter this and I’m always left wondering “why?” Many of us have been exposed to this epidemic. The National Institutes of Health estimates that 10% to 15% of nurses are actively addicted or in recovery. Every state board of nursing manages it differently. As peers, we each struggle internally with how to respond, how to feel, what to say, what to report, and when to report. What education have you had from your organization? What’s the process where you work? How does your state board of nursing manage nurses in jeopardy? Let’s talk! And stay tuned for our feature on recognizing impairment in the workplace, coming in 2017.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Monday, October 24, 2016

Looking through my monthly American Nurses Association (ANA) bulletin, I noted the focus on healthy living for nurses. Not just how we make others healthy, but also what we do to make ourselves healthy. I love this because, as nurses, we often forget our own health. We discuss healthy work environments, such as just culture, anti-bullying, shared governance, empowerment, and mental/social well-being, as well as physical security. These items are monumental in their impact on our sense of self and satisfaction. But what about our physical health and the promotion of a healthy lifestyle? Does your organization and work environment encourage healthy habits? Is there support for tobacco cessation, exercise promotion, and healthy food options? Does your employer set limits on overtime and shift length? Are you allowed to use your accrued time and take wellness days? What about wellness events for employees? Is an employee assistance program available? Tell us about your work environment! And check out the October Nursing made Incredibly Easy! eNews for more on the ANA's "Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation" challenge.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.
About the Author

NursingMadeIncrediblyEasy
The mission of the peer-reviewed journal Nursing made Incredibly Easy! is to meet the ongoing educational needs of nurses in a refreshingly original, easily understood format.

Special Offer

Want to save on your print subscription? Visit http://www.lww.com/Product/1544-5186 and use the appropriate code at checkout:

US: $24.90– use code WGY363AD

Canada: $48.00 – use code WGY363BD

Other countries: $92.25 – use code WGY363CD.