Incredibly Easy blog

The Incredibly Easy blog will expand on selected topics presented in the print journal.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

​I read a great article today that will be in a future issue of NMIE. As a member of the editorial board, I get this pleasurable benefit. The topic is moral distress in nursing and it made me think about the reality that I see every day. From working on ICU, ED, and inpatient floors, I’m acutely aware of how hard it is to be a caregiver and remain untouched emotionally by all that you see. We all have those patients and experiences that create heartbreak, confusion, anger, and sometimes a sense of disconnection in our professional lives. These are the moments that make us take a deep breath and self-evaluate. Remember that you’re doing what you do for a reason and not everyone can do this. Share your stories with us.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Emergency Services Director
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky
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Thursday, June 8, 2017

​In the face of our increasing opioid crisis in the United States, I watched an interesting report on a group of librarians in a large metropolitan city who’ve taken a class on naloxone administration. The report indicated that within the last few months, one particular librarian had revived seven overdosed individuals in the park where the library is located. I applaud the efforts of these individuals to make a difference, but I worry about the safety of the Good Samaritan. What are your thoughts on this? Are there similar programs where you live?

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Emergency Services Director
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.



Tuesday, May 9, 2017

​Mobility in our inpatient population is my search this week. Are you struggling with getting your patients up and ambulating? Physical therapy (PT) is staffing challenged and often unable to meet the needs of our patients that must be up and out of bed. Patients in critical care areas, on ventilators, and bedridden still need mobility and activity. Before PT was available, nurses did the bulk of this work: getting patients up, out of bed, in the chair, walking, and performing range-of-motion exercises. Now nurses, as well as PT, face growing demands with fewer resources; patients don’t always get what they need in terms of mobility. How’s your organization managing this issue? Are there ambulation teams, unlicensed assistive personnel assistance, or an increase in complications due to little or poor mobility? We want to hear from you.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Emergency Services Director
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.



Monday, May 1, 2017

​Are you getting ready for Nurses Week next week (May 6 to 12)? This is our time every year to honor nurses in every aspect of our profession. The American Nurses Association has named 2017 the year of the balance between mind, body and spirit. The May/June issue of Nursing made Incredibly Easy! celebrates you, the professional nurse. And you'll also notice that the NMIE Facebook and Twitter pages have links to helpful articles aimed at increasing your education, strengthening your leadership skills, and recognizing our profession. If you don't follow us on social media, I encourage you to do so. Participating in the many social media avenues available to us professionally provides a mechanism to connect with each other; check job postings; find out about educational offerings, events, and academic opportunities; and more. Celebrate all that is you! Happy Nurses Week!

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.




Tuesday, April 25, 2017

​I've been working with the human resources and recruitment departments to review applicants and look strategically at addressing my facility's nursing shortage. I know that many managers, directors, and healthcare organizations are doing the same. Recently, I had the pleasure of working with two nurses who've returned to the profession after long absences. The process of orientation and mentoring was very involved and sometimes painful, but I believe we mutually agree that it was successful. In both cases, the nurses state that they're happy in their roles and with their decision to return. This is a relatively untapped resource; we should reach out to our peers who left the workforce to raise families, pursue nonclinical roles, or deal with other life changes. Help to rekindle the fire that brought them into nursing. One of the tools and resources that I found very helpful was Nursing made Incredibly Easy! I was able to provide these returning professionals with articles that support best practice in a factual, easy-to-read, and user-friendly format. Reach out to your peers, use your tools, and look for best practices.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.