Nursing made Incredibly Easy

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Incredibly Easy blog
The Incredibly Easy blog will expand on selected topics presented in the print journal.
Monday, September 19, 2016

​Looking through our recent issue of Nursing made Incredibly Easy!, I really enjoyed the education special on diversity. There's currently a huge focus on diversity compliance and competency in the healthcare setting. Many organizations are requiring mandatory competency education and revitalizing their culture to ensure that they allow for cultural differences beyond nationality, race, and religion. The LBGT community has long been overlooked and their unique healthcare considerations underserved. Recently, there's been much media attention (both positive and negative) surrounding the LBGT community and the transgender community in particular. The debate over bathrooms and gender identity has sparked some unhealthy interactions regarding rights, culture, and safety. Once again, the medical community is responding by looking at its policies, admission databases, cultural integrity, and inclusion of patient rights to respect and quality, individualized, patient-centered care. How has your organization responded? Have you had any policy changes or form revisions? How about new education? I urge you to check out the current issue of NMIE and the Education Extra "Focus on Diversity." It's an interesting and helpful bonus.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

​I currently work with a CNO that has a true belief in succession planning! I’m excited by this on a professional level because I also believe in succession training and the way it empowers staff members and ensures the strength and unity of nursing’s future. Although our nursing education and organizations support this type of legacy, I’ve rarely seen it in action. Why do you suppose that is? I remember being told once by a respected mentor that a leader’s job is to educate and empower those you lead to the point where you’re no longer needed! Could it be that some of our leaders fear they may encourage, support, educate, and empower themselves out of a job? I think it may actually be that many don’t truly understand what succession training is. It requires empowering future leaders to think for themselves and stand on their own. Your successors will be in various roles throughout the organization, forging ahead to carry the torch of quality, safety, engagement, and empowerment that was instilled in them by igniting their power to think, grow, and develop as professionals. What are your thoughts on and experiences with this topic?

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Fall is here! The weather is turning cooler and the kids are back in school. Nationally, we’re gearing up for flu season. The vaccines are already hitting the pharmacies and hospitals, and the ads are on television. I thought it would be a great time to gauge your thoughts about mandatory flu vaccination. Some healthcare organizations make it mandatory for all staff members engaged in patient care to receive a flu vaccine. Other facilities “strongly encourage” the vaccine and require a waiver if an employee opts out. Annually, there’s negative press about the vaccines and their efficacy, possible adverse reactions, and people’s right to refuse. Where do you stand on the topic of flu vaccination? Do you get vaccinated? If not, why not? Is vaccination required where you work? We’d love to hear from you.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Monday, August 29, 2016
Working in critical care again after a few years in another service area is wonderful. I missed the bedside care and the acute care itself. As I’m spending time getting to know staff members and discussing their concerns, the most concerning--and one of the most frequent--admission diagnosis is overdose. Twice in 2 weeks I’ve heard TV announcements that, due to a “bad batch” of heroin, there were multiple overdoses reported. Several individuals were admitted to local hospitals; some were treated and released, others weren’t so lucky. I did some research about the rise in heroin use and it appears that it may be linked to the increase in prescription drug abuse. Heroin can be cheaper and easier to obtain. Heroin and opioid overdose have increased to the extent that legislators, pharmacies, and hospitals are working to make naloxone readily available to combat accidental overdose. What’s happening in your area and your organization? What education are you receiving? What programs and protocols are in place to assist you with screening these patients? Let’s hear from you.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.

Monday, August 22, 2016

This weekend, news outlets were covering the Zika virus scare in the United States, focusing on Miami Fla. I watched as they interviewed several people, including pregnant women and tourists, asking what they were doing to protect themselves and their children. One of the tourists identified herself as a nurse vacationing in Miami with her children. During the brief interview, she discussed viruses being more difficult to treat than bacterial infections as her biggest concern.

My biggest concerns involve prevention, protection, early detection, and treatment (in combination) for every community - not just our more tropical locations. We aren’t aware of a threat to our community until a case is diagnosed, making prevention and protection from exposure imperative. What’s going on in your communities, your organization, and your household? We want to hear from you.

Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Nurse Manager
KentuckyOne Health, Saint Joseph Health System
Lexington, Ky.


About the Author

NursingMadeIncrediblyEasy
The mission of the peer-reviewed journal Nursing made Incredibly Easy! is to meet the ongoing educational needs of nurses in a refreshingly original, easily understood format.

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