Caring for patients with burn injuries

Culleiton, Alicia L.; Simko, Lynn M.

Nursing Critical Care . 8(1):14-22, January 2013.

Caring for a patient with severe burn injuries offers many challenges for critical care nurses. Find out about various types of burns and providing initial resuscitative care for a patient if treatment in a designated burn center facility or burn ICU isn't possible.

Acute ischemic stroke: The golden hour

Anderson, Jane A.

Nursing Critical Care . 11(3):28-36, May 2016.

Acute ischemic stroke is a medical emergency resulting from an embolic or thrombotic occlusion of an intracranial artery. This article provides acute care nurses with a summary of recent updates on the rapid evaluation and workup for patient selection and treatment with I.V. fibrinolysis.

Shhh! Too much hospital noise slows recovery

Lim, Fidelindo A.

Nursing Critical Care . 9(2):43-47, March 2014.

Monotonous call bells, oscillating conversations, and clanking equipment disturb patients' rest, especially in the ICU and operating rooms. But besides being irritating, excessive noise causes sleep deprivation, which can lead to hypertension, an increase in cardiovascular disease, impaired immune function, attention and memory deficits, depression and even death.

Zika virus: What nurses need to know

Coyle, Amanda L.

Nursing Critical Care . 11(4):30-34, July 2016.

Local, state, national, and international healthcare organizations are rapidly scaling up their response to the recent Zika virus outbreak. Nurses must stay abreast of the evolving body of knowledge surrounding Zika virus infection in order to provide optimal care to their patients.

Measuring quality care with HCAHPS

Villanueva, Perfecto “Mac; McCall, Levida Dawn

Nursing Critical Care . 7(5):18-21, September 2012.

As hospitals transition to the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Survey as a meaningful measure of patient satisfaction, healthcare leaders are asking if their organizations are prepared.

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Plitnick, Katherine R.

Nursing Critical Care . 9(6):32-37, November 2014.

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Of the 4.7 million in-patient heart-related procedures performed on approximately 4.7 million people annually in the United States, 395,000 of those are coronary artery bypass grafting.

In-hospital cardiac arrest

Leary, Marion

Nursing Critical Care . 10(1):34-40, January 2015.

Hospital teams need experienced leadership, with members filling defined roles to properly treat patients in cardiac arrest. Overcrowding can cause poor communication, prevent task delegation and potentially risk patients' lives. Healthcare professionals are more confident when they have “rolling refreshers” periodically practicing CPR skills, using CPR training manikins, and CPR feedback devices.

Stay up-to-date on anticoagulants

Palatnik, AnneMarie

Nursing Critical Care . 7(6):16-20, November 2012.

Anticoagulation therapy is used to prevent or treat conditions from venous thromboembolism to atrial fibrillation. These drugs are effective, but can be difficult to manage. Find out about the most common anticoagulants, which ones to use when, and how to keep patients safe during anticoagulant therapy.

Caring for the patient with a left ventricular assist device

Chmielinski, April; Koons, Brittany

Nursing Critical Care . 12(2):24-31, March 2017.

Mechanical circulatory support devices such as left ventricular assist devices provide an alternative to heart transplantation for patients with advanced heart failure, and critical care nurses need to understand how to care for these patients.

Managing vasoactive infusions to restore hemodynamic stability

Timmerman, Rosemary A.

Nursing Critical Care . 11(2):35-43, March 2016.

Critically ill patients frequently suffer circulatory disturbances necessitating the use of vasoactive medications. Critical care nurses must know the actions and possible adverse reactions of vasoactive agents and be able to titrate hemodynamic medications to achieve therapeutic endpoints indicating adequate perfusion.

Craniosynostosis

Blake, Stephanie M.; Bradshaw, Wanda T.

Nursing Critical Care . 10(1):27-33, January 2015.

This article discusses the birth defect in which one or more of the joints between the bones of a baby's skull prematurely closes. Cranial growth and brain development are influenced. Neurologic and physiologic after effects can include: auditory and visual impairment, seizures, swallowing dysfunction, heart and lung abnormalities, developmental delays, speech impairments, self-esteem issues, and learning disabilities.

Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome following carotid artery revascularization

Vacca, Vincent M. Jr.; Thomas, Sarah Beth

Nursing Critical Care . 12(1):32-39, January 2017.

Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) is a complication that follows carotid artery revascularization by either carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting. Anticipation, early recognition, and aggressive management of CHS are essential to prevent disastrous complications.

Evidence-based practice for red blood cell transfusions

Fredrich, Nanci L.

Nursing Critical Care . 11(1):31-37, January 2016.

Research regarding the best use of transfusion of all types of blood components has grown over the last 20 years, resulting in numerous studies to support evidence-based practice in transfusion medicine. Current research has compared the use of transfusion thresholds or triggers in various patient populations and the effect of a restrictive or liberal strategy on patient outcomes, adverse events, and complications.

Updating your nutrition care practice

McCarthy, Mary S.; Martindale, Robert G.

Nursing Critical Care . 10(1):18-26, January 2015.

About 65% of ICU patients aren't receiving enough nutrition. When their survival is threatened, nutrition taken orally, topically, through inhalation, or by injection helps improve outcomes. Active nutrients reduce damage to cells, control inflammation, decrease the metabolic response to stress, and improve feeding tolerance.

The nurse as the patient

Nursing Critical Care . 9(2):4, March 2014.

What happens when the nurse is the patient? Don't ignore warning signs that your own health needs attention because if you're in pain, even with friends in the business, you could have to wait for appointments, prescriptions, precertification, and follow-up visits – just like your patients.

Encephalitis in adults: Outcomes in critical care

Vacca, Vincent M. Jr.

Nursing Critical Care . 11(2):14-22, March 2016.

Encephalitis can lead to alterations in level of consciousness, cognition, and behavior as well as fever, headache, seizures, cranial nerve disorders, and motor deficits. Despite advances in technology and pharmacology, encephalitis remains challenging to diagnose and difficult to treat.