Heart Beats

Creator:   Nursing Critical Care
Created:   3/4/2010
Contains:  28 items
Strengthen your ECG assessment skills by reviewing these articles.

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Rhythm self-quiz: Fast and deadly

Craig, Karen Jean

Nursing Critical Care. 8(1):5-6, January 2013.

Test your rhythm strip interpretation using a five-step analysis method. Identify the mystery dysrhythmia, and learn about its causes and management.

Understanding wide-complex tachycardias

Barto, Donna

Nursing Critical Care. 7(2):6-8, March 2012.

This article focuses on determining the origin of a wide-complex tachycardia based on the 12-lead ECG, so that the patient can get the correct treatment.

Resistant hypertension or aortic stenosis?

Doherty, Caroline Lloyd

Nursing Critical Care. 6(5):13-16, September 2011.

Renal artery stenosis can cause resistant hypertension and pulmonary edema that mimic aortic stenosis. This article describes how to differentiate the two conditions.

Responding to pulseless electrical activity

Felmlee, Nancy

Nursing Critical Care. 6(4):14-16, July 2011.

Follow this case study in how to respond when a patient develops pulseless electrical activity, characterized by unresponsiveness and lack of palpable pulse in the presence of organized cardiac electrical activity.

Managing atrial septal defect in adults

Stewart, Diana; Casida, Jesus (Jessie)

Nursing Critical Care. 6(3):5-9, May 2011.

Atrial septal defect in adults can go unnoticed until patients are in their 40s. By recognizing the condition, you can help patients get appropriate care.

Dealing with ICD lead fracture

Haddock, Christopher J.

Nursing Critical Care. 6(1):9-11, January 2011.

Implanted cardioverter-defibrillators can be lifesavers for patients with potentially fatal ventricular dysrhythmias. But lead fractures can cause serious complications if not caught in time by an experienced nurse. Read about how lead fractures occur and how to detect a fracture before it threatens the patient's health.

Deciphering and treating atrioventricular blocks

McDonough, Marjorie

Nursing Critical Care. 5(5):5-7, September 2010.

Atrioventricular heart blocks are among the most challenging rhythms to identify. This article reviews how to recognize and respond to first-, second-, and third-degree AV blocks.

Who's watching the cardiac monitor? Does it matter?

Thomas, Tamekia L.

Nursing Critical Care. 5(4):5-8, July 2010.

Dedicated cardiac monitor watchers—such as those at the author's facility—are one way hospitals are handling compliance with cardiac monitoring outside the ICU.

Atrial fibrillation: Control or convert?

Foran, Catherine K.

Nursing Critical Care. 5(3):5-6, May 2010.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, so recognizing it promptly is crucial. Treatment depends on the patient's clinical presentation—this article describes when to focus on rate control and when rhythm conversion takes priority.

Therapeutic hypothermia and the ECG

Barto, Donna

Nursing Critical Care. 5(2):11-12, March 2010.

Which ECG abnormalities are actually normal in a patient undergoing therapeutic hypothermia? Here's how to know what's normal, recognize impending problems from overcooling, and how to intervene.

Therapeutic hypothermia and the ECG

Barto, Donna

Nursing Critical Care. 5(2):11-12, March 2010.

Which ECG abnormalities are actually normal in a patient undergoing therapeutic hypothermia? Here's how to know what's normal, recognize impending problems from overcooling, and how to intervene.

Wellens syndrome: Subtle clues to big trouble

Geiter, Henry B. Jr.

Nursing Critical Care. 5(1):5-7, January 2010.

About 15% of patients admitted for unstable angina demonstrated ECG changes diagnostic for Wellens syndrome, a critical stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Here's how to recognize this potentially fatal condition and intervene appropriately.

Wellens syndrome: Subtle clues to big trouble

Geiter, Henry B. Jr.

Nursing Critical Care. 5(1):5-7, January 2010.

About 15% of patients admitted for unstable angina demonstrated ECG changes diagnostic for Wellens syndrome, a critical stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Here's how to recognize this potentially fatal condition and intervene appropriately.

Treating preexcitation tachycardias

Geiter, Henry B. Jr.

Nursing Critical Care. 4(6):5-6, November 2009.

The usual treatments for tachycardia can make things worse if your patient has a preexcitation tachycardia. Find out about the differences in treatment and how to intervene appropriately.

Understanding Wolff-Parkinson-White and preexcitation syndromes

Geiter, Henry B. Jr.

Nursing Critical Care. 4(5):6-9, September 2009.

Learn to recognize preexcitation syndromes, including Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, which can have life-threatening implications.

When and why to use continuous ST-segment monitoring

Collins, Michelle L.

Nursing Critical Care. 4(4):6-8, July 2009.

Monitoring the ST segment for silent myocardial ischemia is potentially lifesaving but widely underused. Find out who should be monitored and how to prepare your patient.

Brugada syndrome: Unmasking a silent killer

Lee, Leslie Foran; Felmlee, Nancy

Nursing Critical Care. 4(3):11-13, May 2009.

Brugada syndrome is a genetic cardiac defect that can lead to sudden cardiac death in apparently healthy young people (usually men). Although not fully understood, Brugada syndrome appears to be linked to an ion channel disorder. Careful history-taking and ECG analysis may help you save a patient's life.

Responding to atrial fibrillation

Rocca, Joan Della

Nursing Critical Care. 4(2):5-8, March 2009.

Find out how to respond to atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained dysrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure.

Long QT syndrome: Dangerous delay

Foran, Catherine K.

Nursing Critical Care. 4(1):5-7, January 2009.

By understanding what causes long QT syndrome and how to manage it, you may be able to help your patient avoid the potentially lethal complications of this condition.

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