Nurse Educator

Editor-in-Chief: Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN
ISSN: 0363-3624
Online ISSN: 1538-9855
Frequency: 6 issues / year
Impact Factor: 0.67
Consider Publishing Your Work in Nurse Educator

Continuing its rich tradition of disseminating relevant, timely, and practical articles, Nurse Educator is now also inviting manuscripts on research in nursing education. Have you completed a study about or implemented a theory-guided approach with nursing students, faculty, teaching and learning in nursing, curriculum or policy development, interprofessional collaboration, or another area of nursing education? 

Nurse Educator offers authors these unique advantages:

  • Publication in one of the top nursing education journals
  • Fast review turnaround time: A month for review of your manuscript
  • Fast publication time: A month from acceptance to online publication
  • A readership that includes nurse educators from around the world
  • Publication in one of the few nursing education journals with an impact factor
About this Issue: May/June 2016

Incivility in nursing education affects many dimensions of the learning environment. We often think about incivility in terms of students and faculty, but there is an increasing number of nursing administrators who have experienced incivility from faculty. LaSala and colleagues examined the experiences of academic administrators who were victims of faculty incivility and the devastating effects those experiences had on administrators personally and professionally. Many studies have described palliative care education in prelicensure programs, but limited research has been done on the extent of this education in advanced practice nursing programs. In this issue authors report on their survey of 101 nurse practitioner programs: most programs provided little instruction in palliative care, often only a few hours of lecture, and one-third of the programs offered no instruction. Also concerned about the lack of preparation of nursing students in palliative care, Saylor et al developed an educational experience using simulation. Teams of participants, 1 consisting of nursing/medical students and the other of nursing/medical health care professionals, completed the simulation. There was a significant improvement in self-efficacy and attitudes toward physician-nurse collaboration. Did you know that empathy among nursing students often declines during their nursing education program? To address this concern, Ward conducted a mixed-methods study to assess whether an educational intervention using standardized actors influenced nursing student empathy. Following this intervention students did not have a decline in empathy, and some of the students had improved scores. Another article in this issue shares the results of a study to determine whether consistent exposure to a single patient through case study and simulation affected students’ empathy. Are you looking for an inexpensive way for faculty and students to get to know each other better and develop mentoring relationships? Lewinski and colleagues describe the benefits of a low-cost, student-faculty lunch program to increase mentoring and facilitate cross-program relationships. This program gave students the opportunity to go to lunch with a faculty member of their choice. Many faculty have the challenge of teaching large classes of students and engaging them in active learning. McDaniel and Tornwall developed a case study assignment for a graduate-level pathophysiology course that required students to create digitally enhanced patient stories. Students worked together using commonly available learning technology tools to create content that bridged pathophysiology concepts and clinical practice. In each issue our goal is to provide teaching methods you can use in your own courses, and we do that again in this issue. Read the articles on using arts-enriched pedagogy for teaching, developing a State legislative fellowship for DNP students, building Twitter in a nursing course, and integrating a bystander intervention service-learning project in a course, among others. Make sure you don’t miss the Faculty Development department where the author shares tips for providing constructive feedback to students.

Marilyn Oermann, Editor-in-Chief

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Featured Videos

 

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Dr. Altmiller explains the importance of feedback in student learning. She shares best practices and strategies for giving constructive feedback to students. Whether you are a novice or an experienced teacher, you will learn from this video and her article.
NNE_41.3_McDaniel.jpgThe challenge to educate increasing numbers of nursing students at all levels in both online and in-class environments calls for innovative instructional strategies that may include technology-based assignments. These authors describe a case study assignment developed for a graduate-level pathophysiology course that required students to create digitally enhanced patient stories. Nursing students enrolled in the online and in-class sections of the course worked together using commonly available learning technology tools to create content that bridged pathophysiology concepts and clinical practice.
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In an effort to create an interactive cultural opportunity for nursing students, Dr. Mennenga created a unique clinical experience by “matching” nursing with international students located on the same college campus. Watch this video and read the article to learn about this creative, inexpensive approach to providing a cultural clinical experience for nursing students. using resources on one’s very own campus.

Watch this video and read the article to learn how the faculty integrated a college bystander intervention service-learning project into an entry-level community clinical course. Two years of data showed that students helped improve campus safety. They also developed as professionals. Approximately one-third of the students described a specific incident in which they intervened in the situation.

 

 

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