Editor-in-Chief: Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN
ISSN: 0363-3624
Online ISSN: 1538-9855
Frequency: 6 issues / year
Impact Factor: 0.667
Consider Publishing Your Work in Nurse Educator

Continuing its rich tradition of disseminating relevant, timely, and practical articles, Nurse Educator is now also inviting manuscripts on research in nursing education. Have you completed a study about or implemented a theory-guided approach with nursing students, faculty, teaching and learning in nursing, curriculum or policy development, interprofessional collaboration, or another area of nursing education? 

Nurse Educator offers authors these unique advantages:
• Publication in one of the top nursing education journals
• Fast review turnaround time: A month for review of your manuscript
• Fast publication time: A month from acceptance to online publication
• A readership that includes nurse educators from around the world
• Publication in one of the few nursing education journals with an impact factor

About this Issue: March/April 2015

We are seeing a shift in nursing education from students memorizing and consuming content delivered by the teacher to working in groups to solve problems, analyze cases, and explore questions not yet answered. Students are learning together and from each other, and developing products of their learning. In our lead article Price and colleagues describe how they used digital storytelling as a means for students to create and share their stories about palliative care. Ratta integrated team-based learning (TBL) within a flipped classroom; students used classroom time to solve problems and learn to work in teams. In another article Mennenga describes the changes she made in TBL in her course over a 2-year period. Technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. Shellenbarger and Robb present strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling to facilitate nursing students’ clinical reasoning skills:  this is a must-read article. If you are thinking about other ways of using simulation in your classes, read the article by Hooper et al on implementing high fidelity simulation with large groups of students. In this issue you also will learn how researchers used an eye tracker during a simulation on medication administration. Be sure to read and share with other educators the article by Rutherford-Hemming et al on standards for best practice in simulation. We need research to make decisions about the best ways for students to prepare for their clinical experiences. Turner and Keeler examined the clinical preparation (prelab) done in nursing programs from the student's perspective. More than half of the students surveyed (n=296) believed their prelab learning activities were important, but they created stress and led to reduced sleep. Other articles in this issue share new technologies and teaching strategies that you can use in your own teaching.

Marilyn Oermann, Editor-in-Chief

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  This research compared competency achievement of students (n=146) randomly assigned to 1 long clinical day (12 hours) with those in 2 shorter days (7-8 hours each). There were no significant differences in mean clinical competency achievement scores, and students and faculty concurred on the merits of a longer clinical day. Read the full article in the November/December 2014 issue of Nurse Educator (39:6).
  Learn about using team-based learning within a flipped classroom. Students used classroom time to solve problems while developing professional competencies.  Hear about their experiences in the video now or read the full article in the March/April 2015 issue. 
Using high-fidelity simulations to facilitate student learning is an uncommon practice in Turkish nursing programs. The aim of this study was to understand students’ perceptions of the use of simulation in nursing. This study revealed that high-fidelity simulation is an ideal method of promoting learning by helping students transfer theory into practice, build confidence and teamwork, and raise professional awareness.   Learn more in the video and read the full article in the March/April 2015 issue.
Simulations are conducted typically with a small group of students. This article describes the process for implementing 6 high-fidelity simulations with a large group of nursing students.  Learn more by watching the video and read the article in the March/April 2015 issue.  

 

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Nurse Educator's 40th Anniversary

Our March/April issue continues our celebration of the 40th year of publication of Nurse Educator. We have seen a shift in nursing education from students memorizing content delivered by the teacher to working in groups to solve problems, analyze cases, and explore questions not yet answered. Articles in our March/April issue share teaching strategies for active learning and new technologies you can use in your own teaching. 

Podcasts

As part of our 40th anniversary celebration, we are interviewing leaders in nursing education, many of whom have published articles in Nurse Educator over their careers. They share their perspectives of how nursing education has changed over the 40 years. Listen to our latest podcast episodes with:

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NCSBN National Simulation Study Demonstrates Successful Replacement of Clinical Hours up to 50%

The recently released National Council of State Board of Nursing (NCSBN) National Simulation Study demonstrates the effectiveness of simulation in prelicensure nursing curriculum.  The study examined 3 cohorts of nursing students: a control group using traditional clinical practice and up to 10% simulation, a study group in which 25% of simulation was used, and a study group in which 50% simulation was used instead of traditional clinical hours. There were 666 students who completed the study. Outcome measures assessed clinical competency, nursing knowledge, and critical thinking. The results showed that up to 50% of clinical simulation was effectively substituted in prelicensure core courses.  It also did not affect the pass rates for NCLEX. New graduates were then followed in their first 6 months of employment. The results found no differences in critical thinking, clinical competency, and overall readiness for practice.

The results of this study provide a major contribution to nursing education. This could assist State Boards of Nursing to consider raising their allowed percentages of clinical versus simulation time based on relevant and meaningful research. In turn, it could ease the struggle for clinical sites. More information about the study can be found in the Journal of Nursing Regulation Volume 5, Issue 2, July 2014 Supplement. 

Alma Jackson, PhD, RN, COHN-S,
News Editor at NENewsEditor@gmail.com