Editor-in-Chief: Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN
ISSN: 0363-3624
Online ISSN: 1538-9855
Frequency: 6 issues / year
Impact Factor: 0.667
Consider Publishing Your Work in Nurse Educator

Continuing its rich tradition of disseminating relevant, timely, and practical articles, Nurse Educator is now also inviting manuscripts on research in nursing education. Have you completed a study about or implemented a theory-guided approach with nursing students, faculty, teaching and learning in nursing, curriculum or policy development, interprofessional collaboration, or another area of nursing education? 

Nurse Educator offers authors these unique advantages:
• Publication in one of the top nursing education journals
• Fast review turnaround time: A month for review of your manuscript
• Fast publication time: A month from acceptance to online publication
• A readership that includes nurse educators from around the world
• Publication in one of the few nursing education journals with an impact factor

About this Issue: May/June 2015

Use of social media continues to increase at a dizzying pace, but those technologies create risks of highly visible unprofessionalism. Marnocha et al investigated the posting of unprofessional content online among nursing students. Surveys of nearly 300 schools of nursing revealed that 77% had encountered at least 1 incident of students posting such content. Patton and Lewallen’s article will clear up misunderstandings you might have about legal liability when teaching students in the clinical setting:  this is a must read article. What do nursing faculty in associate degree programs advise students about getting a BSN or higher degree?  The study by O’Neal et al answers that question. In the US, Hispanics and African Americans are underrepresented among nursing students and the nursing workforce. We include an article in this issue on the perceptions of Hispanic and African American nursing students, and of faculty and administrators in schools of nursing. The findings provide a baseline for establishing best practices for minority student recruitment and retention. Other articles in this issue provide guidelines for developing a NP residency program, adding environmental health content and learning experiences in ADN through graduate nursing curricula, revising the content you teach on statistics in your nursing program, planning an orientation for teaching assistants, and more. If you want some new ideas on teaching in the classroom, read the paper about how faculty used Gagne’s 9 events of instruction to spruce up their course and involve students more actively in learning. Take time to read Cindy Clark’s message to faculty on mentoring and our other departments. 

Marilyn Oermann, Editor-in-Chief

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Featured Videos

  Newly hired teaching assistants (TAs) in schools of nursing have varying levels of experience in academic institutions. Therefore, the orientation of TAs is important at a micro level (student instruction) and macro level (mission of the organization). The authors describe a Lean approach to strengthening TA orientation and reducing waste and inconsistency. Developed solutions and tools through the lens of quality improvement are discussed.  Learn more in the video and read the full article in the May/June  2015 issue. 
  This study investigated the posting of unprofessional content online among nursing students. Surveys of 293 schools of nursing revealed that 77% had encountered at least 1 incident of students posting such content. The greatest concerns were about content that students posted related to educational and professional affiliations and to patient confidentiality.  View the video now and look for the full article in the May/June 2015 issue.   
Teaching large numbers of students can be a challenge for both teachers and students. This article presents the impact of using Gagne's 9 events of instruction on student learning and course evaluations over a 3-semester period. Student evaluations indicated enhanced teacher mastery, effectiveness, and enthusiasm.  Learn more in the video and read the full study in the May/June 2015 issue. 
Simulations give students an opportunity to be part of an unknown experience, similar to a movie goer’s first exposure to a popular movie.  While students are encouraged to withhold their experience from other students so that all can benefit from the impact of new learning opportunities, reality tells us that students typically share simulation “spoilers.” In an attempt to give a fresh opportunity for students to “watch the movie without reading the book or synopsis,” the author directed the standardized patient in the simulation to go in a new direction.  Watch the video now and read the full article in the May/June 2015 issue. 
The authors describe an undergraduate nursing research internship program in which students are engaged in research with a faculty mentor. Interns coauthored publications, presented papers and posters at conferences, and received awards. This highly successful program provides a model that can be easily replicated to foster the development of future nurse scientists. Learn about their experience in the video and read the full article in the May/June 2015 issue.   

 

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Nurse Educator's 40th Anniversary

Our March/April issue continues our celebration of the 40th year of publication of Nurse Educator. We have seen a shift in nursing education from students memorizing content delivered by the teacher to working in groups to solve problems, analyze cases, and explore questions not yet answered. Articles in our March/April issue share teaching strategies for active learning and new technologies you can use in your own teaching. 

Podcasts

As part of our 40th anniversary celebration, we are interviewing leaders in nursing education, many of whom have published articles in Nurse Educator over their careers. They share their perspectives of how nursing education has changed over the 40 years. Listen to our latest podcast episodes with:

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News, Notes, & Tips

NCSBN National Simulation Study Demonstrates Successful Replacement of Clinical Hours up to 50%

The recently released National Council of State Board of Nursing (NCSBN) National Simulation Study demonstrates the effectiveness of simulation in prelicensure nursing curriculum.  The study examined 3 cohorts of nursing students: a control group using traditional clinical practice and up to 10% simulation, a study group in which 25% of simulation was used, and a study group in which 50% simulation was used instead of traditional clinical hours. There were 666 students who completed the study. Outcome measures assessed clinical competency, nursing knowledge, and critical thinking. The results showed that up to 50% of clinical simulation was effectively substituted in prelicensure core courses.  It also did not affect the pass rates for NCLEX. New graduates were then followed in their first 6 months of employment. The results found no differences in critical thinking, clinical competency, and overall readiness for practice.

The results of this study provide a major contribution to nursing education. This could assist State Boards of Nursing to consider raising their allowed percentages of clinical versus simulation time based on relevant and meaningful research. In turn, it could ease the struggle for clinical sites. More information about the study can be found in the Journal of Nursing Regulation Volume 5, Issue 2, July 2014 Supplement. 

Alma Jackson, PhD, RN, COHN-S,
News Editor at NENewsEditor@gmail.com