Skip Navigation LinksHome > May/June 2014 - Volume 39 - Issue 3 > Computer Glasses Provide Relief
Nurse Educator:
doi: 10.1097/NNE.0000000000000029
News, Notes and Tips

Computer Glasses Provide Relief

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A survey by the Vision Council found up to 70% of US adults report some form of digital eye strain. These symptoms include dry, red eyes, blurred vision, headaches, back and neck pain, and/or general fatigue. These symptoms are directly correlated with using digital devices for hours at a time.

Nurse educators and students spend a profound amount of unavoidable hours using digital devices. Many academic institutions now consider prolonged computer use as an “essential function of the position.” Computer vision syndrome has been a diagnosable work-related condition for a number of years, and many solutions have been suggested. These include lowering the light on the visual display, decreasing glare on the computer screen, or using an American Optometric Association–approved glare screen. More information can be found under the search term “computer vision syndrome” on the OSHA Web site, www.osha.gov.

There are new glasses now being recommended by many optometrists. They have a yellow lens, which users report creates less burning, eye fatigue, and eye strain. Bifocal users can also use them by ordering a half-strength magnifier. For example, instead of a 2.0 magnifier for close-up work, a strength of 1.0 may work well for computer vision as the distance is greater.

Dr Jeffrey Anschel is an internationally renowned optometrist. His expertise includes the workplace impact of computer vision syndrome. He is also a technical adviser for Gunnar Optiks, one of the makers of this eyewear. Readers rubbing their eyes in disbelief or eyestrain can investigate eyewear options at Gunnar Optiks or DebsSpecs.com.

Submitted by: Alma Jackson, PhD, RN, COHN-S, News Editor at NENewsEditor@gmail.com.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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