You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Single Case Study of Brain FDG PET Imaging in a Patient With Catatonia

Breker, Dane MD*; Bohnen, Nicolaas I. MD, PhD

Clinical Nuclear Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/RLU.0b013e3182708327
Interesting Images
Abstract

Abstract: We report a case of bilateral occipitotemporal and thalamic hypometabolism on FDG PET in a 19-year-old male patient who presented with altered mental status. He had a history of static encephalopathy and presented with visual hallucinations and decreased verbal output, sleep, and appetite 7 days after starting amoxicillin for otitis media. Extensive evaluation failed to demonstrate any infectious, inflammatory, autoimmune-mediated (including negative testing for NMDA receptor antibody), paraneoplastic, or toxic-metabolic etiology. Ultimately, he responded well to a benzodiazepine challenge and electroconvulsive therapy and was diagnosed with catatonia.

Author Information

From the *Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Taubman 1st Floor, Reception C, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, SPC 5316, Ann Arbor; and †Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, 24 Frank Lloyd Drive, Box 362, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Received for publication February 28, 2012; and revision accepted August 22, 2012.

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: none declared.

Reprints: Dane Breker, MD, Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Taubman 1st Floor, Reception C, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, SPC 5316, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. E-mail: dbreker@med.umich.edu.

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins