Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

18F-Fluoride PET/CT Allows Detection of Hyperostosis and Osseous Involvement in Meningioma: Initial Experience

Tateishi, Ukihide MD*; Tateishi, Kensuke MD; Shizukuishi, Kazuya MD*; Shishikura, Ayako MD*; Murata, Hidetoshi MD; Inoue, Tomio MD*; Kawahara, Nobutaka MD

doi: 10.1097/RLU.0b013e318279fd79
Original Articles

Purpose The present study was conducted to assess the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluoride PET/CT in evaluating hyperostosis and osseous involvement in patients with meningioma.

Patients and Methods Thirty-four patients with meningioma (mean age, 61 years) underwent 18F-fluoride PET/CT before surgery. In 24 patients (71%), 18F-FDG PET/CT was also given before surgery, and the results were compared. The images were reviewed by 2 board-certified nuclear medicine specialists who were unaware of any clinical information and a consensus was reached. Uptake patterns and measurements of tracers were compared with pathological findings from resected specimens, with hyperostosis and osseous involvement as the reference standard.

Results There were 27 grade I tumors (79%) and 7 grade II tumors (21%). The primary tumor focus was identified in each patient using both 18F-fluoroide PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT, but there were no significant correlations in the degree of uptake between the 2 tracers. The SUVmax, SUVmax corrected for lean body mass (SULmax), and tumor metabolic volume (TMV) for 18F-fluoride and 18F-FDG were greater in grade II tumors than in grade I tumors. Hyperostosis and osseous involvement was identified in 12 tumors (38%). The SUVmax, SULmax, and TMV of tumors visualized with 18F-fluoride PET/CT were greater in tumors with hyperostosis and osseous involvement than in those without (P = 0.005, P = 0.003, and P = 0.006, respectively). In contrast, the SUVmax, SULmax, and TMV of tumors visualized with 18F-FDG PET/CT were similar regardless of hyperostosis or osseous involvement.

Conclusions 18F-fluoride PET/CT may improve detection of hyperostosis and osseous involvement in patients with meningioma.

From the Departments of *Radiology, and †Neurosurgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

Received for publication June 4, 2012; revision accepted September 27, 2012.

Supported in part by the National Cancer Center Research and Development Fund 23-A-25.

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: none declared.

Reprints: Ukihide Tateishi, MD, Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3–9, Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 236-0004, Japan. E-mail: utateish@yokohama-cu.ac.jp.

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins