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Vascular Metastatic Lesion in the Pelvis Mimicking Gastrointestinal Bleeding

KORKMAZ, MELIHA M.D.; KIM, E. EDMUND M.D.; WONG, FRANKLIN C. M.D., PH.D.; PODOLOFF, DONALD A. M.D.

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Nuclear venogram of the lower extremity using Tc-99m labeled RBCs was performed in a 62-year-old man with prostate cancer, and suggested active bleeding in the left descending colon and sigmoid. However, the patient had a follow-up bone scan using Tc-99m MDP, which revealed markedly increasing diffuse radioactivity in the left pelvic bone, indicating progressive metastasis. Increasing osteoblastic lesion involving the entire left iliac bone was also found on follow-up CT scan of the pelvis. The patient's low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were stabilized after transfusion with one pint of blood. However, the patient died 6 months later because of disseminated metastases.

From the Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, and the Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ankara, Cebeci Hospital, Ankara, Turkey

Received for publication March 9, 1995; revision accepted August 21, 1995.

Reprint requests: E. Edmund Kim, M.D., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Box 59, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030.

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