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Commercial and Noncommercial Strength and Conditioning Practices in the United States

Nuzzo, James L. MS, CSCS

Strength & Conditioning Journal: April 2014 - Volume 36 - Issue 2 - p 66–72
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0000000000000042
Article

ABSTRACT: AS THE STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING FIELD CONTINUES TO GROW, DISCUSSIONS WITHIN THE FIELD SHOULD ENCOMPASS TOPICS OUTSIDE OF THE HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES, SUCH AS BUSINESS. IN THIS ARTICLE, IT IS PROPOSED THAT THE FIELD OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING NOW CONSISTS OF 2 GENERALLY DIFFERENT TYPES OF PRACTICES: COMMERCIAL AND NONCOMMERCIAL. DEFINITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE 2 PRACTICE TYPES ARE PROVIDED, AS WELL AS, A SUMMARY OF RELEVANT RESEARCH FINDINGS. THE GOAL OF RECOGNIZING AND RESEARCHING THESE 2 TYPES OF PRACTICES SHOULD BE TO UNDERSTAND THEIR UNIQUE BENEFITS AND LIMITATIONS, AND ULTIMATELY, PROVIDE CONSUMERS WITH THE BEST POSSIBLE STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING SERVICES. A VIDEO ABSTRACT OF THIS ARTICLE CAN BE FOUND IN VIDEO, SUPPLEMENTAL DIGITAL CONTENT 1 HTTP://LINKS.LWW.COM/SCJ/A134.

School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia; and Neuroscience Research Australia, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The author reports no conflicts of interest. The author is supported by a University of New South Wales International Postgraduate Research Scholarship and a Neuroscience Research Australia Supplementary Scholarship.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-scj).

James L. Nuzzo is a PhD student of Physiology and Pharmacology in the School of Medical Sciences, University New South Wales and Neuroscience Research Australia.

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© 2014 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association