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The Role of the Pediatric Exercise Specialist in Treating Exercise Deficit Disorder in Youth

Faigenbaum, Avery D. EdD, CSCS1; Lloyd, Rhodri S. PhD, CSCS*D2; Sheehan, Damien CSCS3; Myer, Gregory D. PhD, CSCS4,5,6

Strength & Conditioning Journal: June 2013 - Volume 35 - Issue 3 - p 34–41
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e318285618c
Article

ABSTRACT ALTHOUGH THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF REGULAR EXERCISE FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS ARE EXTENSIVE, MOST YOUTH FAIL TO MEET CURRENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DAILY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. SPECIFICALLY, AN INCREASING NUMBER OF YOUTH DEMONSTRATE SYMPTOMS OF EXERCISE DEFICIT DISORDER DURING THE GROWING YEARS, WHICH CAN LEAD TO A PROGRESSION OF PATHOLOGICAL PROCESSES. ALTHOUGH THE CRITICAL IMPORTANCE OF THIS PUBLIC HEALTH CONCERN HAS YET TO GARNER THE RECOGNITION TO SUPPORT HEALTH CARE REFORM, PHYSICAL INACTIVITY SHOULD BE IDENTIFIED EARLY IN LIFE AND YOUNG PATIENTS SHOULD BE REFERRED TO A PEDIATRIC EXERCISE SPECIALIST FOR PREVENTATIVE CARE.

1Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey

2Department of Physiology and Health, School of Sport, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, United Kingdom

3Department of Science & Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, Carlow, Ireland

4Sports Medicine Biodynamics Center and Human Performance Laboratory, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

5Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio

6Departments of Family Medicine, Biomedical Engineering, and Physiology & Cell Biology, The Ohio State University Sports Medicine Center, Columbus, Ohio

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding:The authors acknowledge funding support from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases grants (R01-AR05563).

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Avery D. Faigenbaumis a full professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at The College of New Jersey.

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Rhodri S. Lloydis a lecturer in Physiology and Health at Cardiff Metropolitan University and is pediatric lead for the United Kingdom Strength and Conditioning Association.

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Damien Sheehanis a program director and lecturer in the Department of Science & Health at the Institute of Technology Carlow in Ireland.

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Gregory D. Myeris director of Research and the Human Performance Laboratory for the Division of Sports Medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and holds primary academic appointments in the Departments of Pediatrics and Orthopaedic Surgery within the College of Medicine at University of Cincinnati.

© 2013 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association