Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Mobility Training for the Young Athlete

Brooks, Toby PhD, ATC, CSCS1; Cressey, Eric MA, CSCS2

Strength & Conditioning Journal: June 2013 - Volume 35 - Issue 3 - p 27–33
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3182823435
Article

ABSTRACT CONTEMPORARY CORRECTIVE EXERCISE TECHNIQUES EMPHASIZING THE IMPORTANCE OF ADEQUATE MOVEMENT ABILITY AND SOFT TISSUE EXTENSIBILITY ARE NOW RELATIVELY COMMON IN MOST STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PROGRAMS. DESPITE DEMONSTRATED POTENTIAL FOR PERFORMANCE DEFICIT, PREACTIVITY FLEXIBILITY TRAINING HAS BEEN EMPLOYED AND CONTINUES TO BE USED BY MANY SPORT COACHES. PARTICULARLY, IN THE DEVELOPING ATHLETE, THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MOBILITY AND FLEXIBILITY TRAINING ARE SIGNIFICANT. THE PURPOSE OF THIS ARTICLE IS TO DEFINE MOBILITY AND DISCUSS THE PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS OF INCORPORATING MOBILITY MOVEMENTS, DRILLS, AND EXERCISES INTO PROGRAMMING FOR YOUNG ATHLETES TO REDUCE THE RISK OF INJURY AND MAXIMIZE PERFORMANCE.

Supplemental Digital Content is Available in the Text.

1Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, Texas

2Cressey Performance, Hudson, Massachusetts

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The authors report no conflicts of interest and no source of funding.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-scj).

Figure

Figure

Toby Brooks is an assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock. He also serves as director of Research and Education for the International Youth Conditioning Association.

Figure

Figure

Eric Cressey is the president and cofounder of Cressey Sports Performance in Hudson.

© 2013 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association