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High-Intensity Exercise Tolerance: An Update on Bioenergetics and Assessment

Pettitt, Robert W. PhD, ATC, CSCS*D; Clark, Ida E. MS

Strength & Conditioning Journal: April 2013 - Volume 35 - Issue 2 - p 11–16
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31828a9520
Article

ABSTRACT: THE STEADY-STATE MODEL OF BIOENERGETICS FAILS TO ACCURATELY DESCRIBE THE METABOLISM FOR HIGH-INTENSITY POWER. THIS ARTICLE REEXAMINES THE ROLE OF PHOSPHOCREATINE, LACTATE PRODUCTION, AND THE IMPORTANCE OF AEROBIC METABOLISM DURING SHORT-TERM HIGH-INTENSITY POWER PERFORMANCE. METABOLIC AND MECHANICAL TESTS OF HIGH-INTENSITY POWER HAVE EVOLVED IN THE PAST 40 YEARS. THE AUTHORS COMPARED THE MAXIMAL ACCUMULATED OXYGEN-DEFICIT MODEL VERSUS THE CRITICAL POWER MODEL AND SUMMARIZED THE RECENTLY DEVELOPED 3-MINUTE ALL-OUT EXERCISE TEST (3 MT). THE 3 MT OFFERS THE STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PROFESSIONAL A SIMPLE METHOD OF ESTIMATING AN ATHLETE'S TOLERANCE TO HIGH-INTENSITY POWER EXERCISE.

Viola Holbrook Human Performance Laboratory, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Minnesota

Conflicts of Interest and Source of Funding: The authors report no conflicts of interest and no source of funding.

Robert W. Pettitt serves as coordinator of the exercise science and exercise physiology programs at Minnesota State University.

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Ida E. Clark serves as an assistant professor of exercise science at Minnesota State University.

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© 2013 National Strength and Conditioning Association