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Vertical Jump and Power

Darmiento, Anthony CSCS; Galpin, Andrew J. PhD, CSCS, NCSA-CPT; Brown, Lee E. EdD, CSCS*D, FNSCA

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3182752b25
Article
Abstract

SUMMARY: POWER AND JUMPING ABILITY CORRELATE WITH SPORT PERFORMANCE. IMPROVING MAXIMAL FORCE AND/OR VELOCITY INCREASES POWER PRODUCTION, AND THEREFORE THEORETICALLY ENHANCES GAME PLAY. COACHES AND RESEARCHERS ALIKE ACKNOWLEDGE THAT BOTH JUMPING SPECIFIC (E.G., PLYOMETRICS) AND NONJUMPING ACTIVITIES (E.G., RESISTANCE TRAINING) FUNCTION AS VALUABLE METHODS OF INCREASING POWER. HOWEVER, THEIR EFFICACY AND MECHANISMS OF ADAPTATION ARE OFTEN ARGUED. THIS ARTICLE PRESENTS A BRIEF OVERVIEW OF VERTICAL JUMPING, POWER, TRAINING MODALITIES AND PROVIDES A SAMPLE 12-WEEK TRAINING CYCLE.

Author Information

Center for Sport Performance, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, California

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Anthony Darmiento is a Masters Student at the Center for Sport Performance in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Fullerton.

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Andrew J. Galpin is an Assistant Professor at the Center for Sport Performance in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Fullerton.

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Lee E. Brown is a Professor at the Center for Sport Performance in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Fullerton.

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© 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association