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Power Associations With Running Speed

Triplett, N. Travis PhD, FNSCA, CSCS*D; Erickson, Travis M. MS, CSCS; McBride, Jeffrey M. PhD, FNSCA, CSCS

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31826f0e0e
Article
Abstract

SUMMARY: SPEED IN SPORT IS MOST COMMONLY DESCRIBED AS THE ABILITY TO MOVE THE BODY OVER A SET DISTANCE IN THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE TIME. RUNNING SPEED IS A COMMON BASE SKILL FOR MANY SPORTS. THERE ARE SEVERAL COMPONENTS TO SPEED THAT ARE RELATED TO POWER PRODUCTION, INCLUDING THE AMOUNT OF TIME SPENT ACCELERATING, MAXIMUM FORCE CAPABILITY, STRIDE LENGTH AND RATE, AND RUNNING MECHANICS IN GENERAL. TRAINING TO IMPROVE SPEED SHOULD ADDRESS EACH OF THESE COMPONENTS.

Author Information

Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina

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N. Travis Triplett is a professor and program director of the Exercise Science program in the Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science at Appalachian State University.

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Travis M. Erickson is a lecturer in the Exercise Science program in the Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science at Appalachian State University.

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Jeffrey M. McBride is a professor and graduate program director of the Exercise Science program in the Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science at Appalachian State University.

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© 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association