Share this article on:

Nutrient Timing for Resistance Exercise

Campbell, Bill I. PhD, CSCS1; Wilborn, Colin D. PhD, CSCS, ATC2; La Bounty, Paul M. PhD, MPT, CSCS3; Wilson, Jacob M. PhD, CSCS4

Strength & Conditioning Journal: August 2012 - Volume 34 - Issue 4 - p 2–10
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3182558e16
Article

SUMMARY: RESISTANCE TRAINING IMPROVES LEAN BODY MASS AND MUSCULAR STRENGTH. THE ADDITION OF HIGH-QUALITY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE TAKEN IMMEDIATELY AFTER RESISTANCE EXERCISE ENHANCES THE ANABOLIC RESPONSE TO AN ACUTE BOUT OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE. THIS CONCEPT OF FOCUSING ON “WHEN TO EAT” IN RELATION TO THE RESISTANCE EXERCISE BOUT IS KNOWN AS NUTRIENT TIMING. THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE DISCUSSES THE CONCEPT OF NUTRIENT TIMING AND ITS IMPACT ON RECOVERY, NET PROTEIN BALANCE, AND IMPROVING MUSCLE MASS AND MUSCULAR STRENGTH.

1School of Physical Education and Exercise Science, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida

2College of Education, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, Texas

3School of Education, Baylor University, Waco, Texas

4Department of Health Sciences and Human Performance, University of Tampa, Tampa, Florida

Bill I. Campbell is an assistant professor of Exercise Science and director of the Exercise and Performance Nutrition Laboratory at the University of South Florida.

Figure. No caption a...

Colin D. Wilborn is an assistant professor of Exercise Science and director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of Mary Hardin Baylor.

Figure. No caption a...

Paul M. La Bounty is an assistant professor of Anatomy, Physiology, and Nutrition at Baylor University.

Figure. No caption a...

Jacob M. Wilson is an assistant professor of Health Sciences and Human Performance at the University of Tampa.

Figure. No caption a...
© 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association