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Task Complexity and Jump Landings in Injury Prevention for Basketball Players

Section Editor(s): McCormick, Brian T. MS

Strength & Conditioning Journal: April 2012 - Volume 34 - Issue 2 - p 89–92
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31823ee08e
Article

SUMMARY: THE PREVALENCE OF INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAMS CONTINUES TO INCREASE, BUT THE INJURY RATES REMAIN CONSTANT. THESE PROGRAMS USE A BLOCK PRACTICE SCHEDULE AND CLOSED-SKILL EXERCISES, BUT GAMES ARE RANDOM AND INVOLVE OPEN SKILLS. TO IMPROVE THE EFFICACY OF THE NEUROMUSCULAR TRAINING PROGRAMS AND TREND THE INJURY RATE DOWNWARD, THESE PROGRAMS SHOULD INCORPORATE MOTOR LEARNING THEORY. BY INCORPORATING MORE RANDOM VARIABLE PRACTICE, ADDING COMPLEXITY TO EXERCISES, AND LESSENING THE RELIANCE ON THE VISUAL SYSTEM FOR FEED-FORWARD MOTOR CONTROL, ATHLETES WOULD BE PREPARED BETTER TO HANDLE THE STRESSES OF GAME ACTIVITIES.

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-scj).

Brian T. McCormick is a doctoral student at the University of Utah in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science and a consultant to basketball organizations, coaches, players, and clubs with Brian McCormick Basketball.

© 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association