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Strength and Conditioning Considerations for Female Mixed Martial Artists

Schick, Monica G MS, CSCS1; Brown, Lee E EdD, CSCS*D, FNSCA2; Schick, Evan E MS, CSCS1

Strength & Conditioning Journal: February 2012 - Volume 34 - Issue 1 - pp 66-75
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31824443e2
Article

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS (MMA) IS A COMBAT SPORT THAT COMBINES BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU (BJJ), MUAY THAI KICKBOXING, AND WRESTLING. ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE CAN BE ENHANCED BY THE APPLICATION OF A TRAINING PROGRAM SPECIFIC TO MMA, WHICH IS A PHYSICALLY DEMANDING ACTIVITY THAT USES BOTH ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC ENERGY SYSTEMS. THERE IS NO PEER-REVIEWED RESEARCH REGARDING THE BEST POSSIBLE TRAINING METHODS FOR A FEMALE MMA FIGHTER. THIS ARTICLE WILL ASSESS THE PHYSIOLOGICAL DEMANDS OF MMA, EXAMINE THE NEEDS OF FEMALE COMBAT ATHLETES, DISCUSS PEER-REVIEWED RESEARCH ABOUT COMBAT SPORT TRAINING METHODS, AND SUGGEST PROPER SPORT-SPECIFIC TRAINING STRUCTURES THAT WILL OPTIMIZE PERFORMANCE AND REDUCE THE RISK OF INJURY.

1Department of Kinesiology, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio; and 2Department of Kinesiology, California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, California

Monica G. Schick is a doctoral student in the Exercise Biology Laboratory at the University of Toledo.

Lee E. Brown is a professor of Strength and Conditioning and director of the Center of Sport Performance at California State University, Fullerton.

Evan E. Schick is a doctoral student in the Exercise Biology Laboratory at the University of Toledo.

© 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association