Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Injury Incidence, Body Site, and Severity in Soccer Players Aged 6–18 Years: Implications for Injury Prevention

Rumpf, Michael Clemens MS1; Cronin, John PhD2

Strength & Conditioning Journal: February 2012 - Volume 34 - Issue 1 - pp 20-31
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31821a9833
Article

INJURY INCIDENCE DATA FOR YOUTH PARTICIPANTS IN SOCCER HAVE BEEN COLLATED AND SUMMARIZED. SUCH INFORMATION SHOULD FORM A BASIS FOR INJURY PREVENTION PRACTICES. PLAYER CONTACT ACCOUNTS FOR MOST INJURIES (40–66%), WHEREAS THE LOWER EXTREMITIES ARE CONSIDERED THE MOST VULNERABLE INJURY SITE IN THE BODY (70%). STRAINS (24%), SPRAINS (31%), AND CONTUSIONS (20%) ACCOUNT FOR 75% OF ALL INJURIES REPORTED THROUGHOUT THE INCLUDED LITERATURE. THESE SOFT TISSUE INJURIES RESULT IN MINOR (1–3 DAYS, 18%), MILD (3–7 DAYS, 36%), AND MODERATE (>1 WEEK, 30%) RECOVERY DURATIONS. SPECIFIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAMS ARE PRESENTED.

1Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand; and 2School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia

Michael Clemens Rumpf is a PhD candidate at the Auckland University of Technology.

John Cronin is the director of the Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand and professor of Strength and Conditioning, Exercise Science Stream.

© 2012 National Strength and Conditioning Association