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Warm-up, Stretching, and Cool-down Strategies for Combat Sports

Costa, Pablo B PhD1; Medeiros, Hugo B O BS2; Fukuda, David H MS, CSCS3

Strength & Conditioning Journal: December 2011 - Volume 33 - Issue 6 - pp 71-79
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31823504c9
Articles

COMBATANTS HAVE BEEN FIGHTING FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. STRUCTURED COMBAT SPORTS BETWEEN 2 MEN HAVE EXISTED FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS AS A SPORT SIMILAR TO WHAT WE CURRENTLY KNOW AS MIXED MARTIAL ARTS (MMA). SEVERAL CHANGES HAVE OCCURRED IN MMA IN THE LAST 2 DECADES, ALLOWING THE SPORT TO BECOME MORE PROFESSIONAL, WITH RULES, MEDIA EXPOSURE, AGENTS, AND MILLIONS OF SPECTATORS WORLDWIDE. THUS, IT IS IMPORTANT TODAY FOR ATHLETES AND STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING COACHES TO BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE MOST APPROPRIATE FORMS OF TRAINING FOR THESE MODALITIES, INCLUDING NOT ONLY FIGHTING TECHNIQUE BUT ALSO OTHER RELATED COMPONENTS OF OPTIMAL PHYSICAL CONDITIONING, SUCH AS WARM-UP, FLEXIBILITY TRAINING, AND COOL-DOWN.

1Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, California State University—San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California; 2Graduate Program in Physical Education, Gama Filho University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and 3Metabolic and Body Composition Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma

Pablo B. Costa is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, San Bernardino.

Hugo B. O. Medeiros is currently a master research student in the Graduate Program in Physical Education at Gama Filho University.

David H. Fukuda is currently a doctoral research and teaching assistant in the Metabolic and Body Composition Laboratory at the University of Oklahoma in the Department of Health and Exercise Science.

© 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association