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Physical Activity and Traumatic Brain Injury

Irwin, Kelley BS; Ede, Alison MS; Buddhadev, Harsh BPT; Driver, Simon PhD; Ronai, Peter MS, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, ACSM RCEP

Strength & Conditioning Journal: August 2011 - Volume 33 - Issue 4 - p 43-47
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e318210e899
Columns

COMPLETING THE RECOMMENDED AMOUNTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN THE FORM OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING EXERCISES EACH WEEK MAY PREVENT REGRESSION OF PERFORMANCE, DECREASE THE RISKS OF SECONDARY HEALTH CONDITIONS, AND IMPROVE THE FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY OF AN INDIVIDUAL WITH A TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY HELPING REGAIN INDEPENDENCE AFTER INJURY.

Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas

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Column Editor

The column was completed through the Disability and Well-being Consortium at the University of North Texas.

Kelley Irwinis a graduate student in the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas.

Alison Edeis a graduate of the master's program in the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas.

Harsh Buddhadevis a graduate student in the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas.

Simon Driveris an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas.

© 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association