Hamstring Strains: Basic Science and Clinical Research Applications for Preventing the Recurrent Injury

Sherry, Marc A DPT, CSCS1; Best, Thomas M MD, PhD2,3; Silder, Amy PhD4,5; Thelen, Darryl G PhD6,7,8; Heiderscheit, Bryan C PhD, PT6,8,9

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e31821e2f71
Article
Abstract

HAMSTRING INJURIES OCCUR FREQUENTLY, WITH A HIGH RECURRENCE RATE, IN SPORTS THAT REQUIRE EITHER HIGH-SPEED SKILLED MOVEMENTS OR EXCESSIVE HIP FLEXION WITH KNEE EXTENSION. A PREVIOUS HAMSTRING INJURY IS THE GREATEST RISK FACTOR FOR A FUTURE HAMSTRING INJURY, WHICH HAS LED SPORTS MEDICINE PROFESSIONALS TO SEARCH FOR IMPROVED POSTINJURY REHABILITATION STRATEGIES. ATHLETES MAY SHOW POSTINJURY STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN THE MUSCLE-TENDON UNIT AND BE AT RISK FOR REINJURY FOR UP TO A YEAR AFTER RETURN TO SPORT. UNDERSTANDING THE POSTINJURY CHANGES CAN HELP CREATE PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR APPROPRIATE RECONDITIONING AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE PROGRAMS.

Author Information

1Sports Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin; 2Division of Sports Medicine and 3Biomedical Engineering and Bioinformatics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; 4Department of Bioengineering and 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California; 6Department of Mechanical Engineering, 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, and 8Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; and 9Runners' Clinic, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.nsca-lift.org).

Marc Sherry is a physical therapist and an athletic trainer at the University of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Center.

Thomas M. Best is a professor and the chief of the Division of Sports Medicine at The Ohio State University.

Amy Silder is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Bioengineering and Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Stanford University.

Darryl G. Thelen is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

Bryan C. Heiderscheit is an associate professor in the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

© 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association