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Resistance Circuit Training: Its Application for the Adult Population

Waller, Mike MA, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D; Miller, Jason MS, CSCS; Hannon, James PhD, CSCS

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181f45179
Article
Abstract

THE PURPOSE OF THE ARTICLE IS TO FOCUS ON RESISTANCE CIRCUIT TRAINING (RCT) AS A METHOD OF STRENGTH TRAINING FOR THE ADULT POPULATION. HEALTH-FITNESS ADAPTATIONS GAINED FROM RCT INCLUDE IMPROVED V̇o2max (MAXIMAL AMOUNT OF OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF THE BODY DURING EXERCISE) IN CERTAIN CASES, AN INCREASE IN TIME TO EXHAUSTION, A DECREASE IN RESTING BLOOD PRESSURE, INCREASED MUSCULAR STRENGTH, AND CHANGES IN CIRCULATING CHOLESTEROL AND HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS. RCT MAY USE A PERIODIZED OR PROGRESSIVE PROGRAM MODEL IN A CONDENSED FORM TO ACHIEVE HEALTH-FITNESS RESULTS BY THE CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER DETAILING LONG-TERM AND SHORT-TERM PROGRAM PLANS.

Author Information

1Department of Exercise and Sports Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and 2Department of Human Movement and Exercise Science, Sacred Heart University, Trumbull, Connecticut

Mike Waller a doctoral student in exercise physiology at the University of Utah.

Jason Miller an Instructor in the Department of Human Movement and Exercise Science at Sacred Heart University.

James Hannon an Associate Professor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science at the University of Utah.

© 2011 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association