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Nutritional Strategies and Immune Function

Rossi, Stephen J PhD, CSCS1; Buford, Thomas W PhD, CSCS2; McMillan, Jim EdD1; Kovacs, Mark S PhD, CSCS3; Marshall, A Elizabeth MS, RD, CSCS4

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181fc5155
Article
Abstract

IMMUNE DYSFUNCTION CAN BE A MAJOR SOURCE OF DECREASED PERFORMANCE IN ATHLETES. IT CURRENTLY APPEARS THAT THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON INFLAMMATORY AND IMMUNE RESPONSES ARE HORMETIC IN NATURE, MEANING THAT MODERATE EXERCISE IS BENEFICIAL, WHEREAS CHRONIC INTENSE EXERCISE CAN BE DETRIMENTAL. EXTREME CHRONIC EXERCISE CAN LEAD TO IMMUNODEPRESSION AND POSSIBLY SYMPTOMS OF OVERTRAINING. BECAUSE MANY ATHLETES TRAIN AT EXTREME VOLUMES AND/OR INTENSITIES, AN UNDERSTANDING BY THE ATHLETES AND COACHES OF BASIC THEORIES OF IMMUNODEPRESSION IS IMPORTANT IN ENSURING QUALITY TRAINING.

Author Information

1Health and Human Performance Laboratory, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia; 2Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; 3Player Development, United States Tennis Association, Boca Raton, Florida; and 4Nutritional Feats Nutrition Consulting, Statesboro, Georgia

Stephen J. Rossi is an assistant professor in the department of Health and Kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.

Thomas W. Buford is a lecturer in the Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine University of Florida.

Jim McMillan is an associate professor in the department of Health and Kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.

Mark S. Kovacs is the senior manager of Strength and Conditioning/Sport Science for the Unites States Tennis Association's player development program.

A. Elizabeth Marshall is a nutrition consultant and part time instructor of Nutrition and FoodScience in the department of Health and Kinesiology, Georgia Southern University.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association