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Understanding Position Transducer Technology for Strength and Conditioning Practitioners

Harris, Nigel K PhD1; Cronin, John PhD1,2; Taylor, Kristie-Lee2,3; Boris, Jidovtseff PhD4,1; Sheppard, Jeremy PhD3

Strength & Conditioning Journal: August 2010 - Volume 32 - Issue 4 - pp 66-79
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181eb341b
Article

STRENGTH AND POWER ASSESSMENTS IN CONDITIONING PRACTICE HAVE TYPICALLY INVOLVED RUDIMENTARY MEASURES SUCH AS 1 REPETITION MAXIMUM. MORE COMPLEX LABORATORY ANALYSIS HAS BEEN AVAILABLE BUT BECAUSE OF THE PRICE AND PORTABILITY OF EQUIPMENT, SUCH ANALYSIS REMAINED IMPRACTICAL TO MOST PRACTITIONERS. RECENTLY, A NUMBER OF DEVICES HAVE BECOME AVAILABLE THAT ARE REASONABLY INEXPENSIVE AND PORTABLE AND OFFER A GREAT DEAL OF INFORMATION THAT CAN BE USED TO GUIDE PROGRAMMING AND TRAINING TO BETTER EFFECT. ONE SUCH DEVICE IS THE LINEAR POSITION TRANSDUCER. THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES THIS PIECE OF TECHNOLOGY FROM ITS DESIGN TO HOW IT MAY BE USED TO INFORM PRACTICE.

1Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand; 2School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia; 3Physiology Department, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, Australia; and 4Sports Science Department, University of Liege, Allee des sports, Liege, Belgium

Nigel K. Harris

is a senior lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science at AUT University and a strength and conditioning coach.

John Cronin

is a professor in Strength and Conditioning at AUT University and holds an adjunct professorial position at Edith Cowan University.

Kristie-Lee Taylor

is currently completing her PhD at Edith Cowan University in conjunction with the Department of Physiology at the Australian Institute of Sport.

Boris Jidovtseff

is senior lecturer in Strength and Conditioning at the University of Liege, Belgium, and is currently completing postdoctoral research at AUT University.

Jeremy Sheppard

is senior strength scientist and strength and conditioning coach at Queensland Academy of Sport, Australia.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association