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Transference of Strength and Power Adaptation to Sports PerformanceHorizontal and Vertical Force Production

Randell, Aaron D MSc1; Cronin, John B PhD1,2; Keogh, Justin W L PhD1; Gill, Nicholas D PhD1

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181e91eec
Article
Abstract

THE TRAINING OF HORIZONTAL PROPULSIVE FORCE GENERATION IS ONE ASPECT OF MANY SPORTS THAT IS NOT EASILY SIMULATED WITH TRADITIONAL GYM-BASED RESISTANCE TRAINING METHODS, WHICH PRINCIPALLY WORK THE LEG MUSCULATURE IN A VERTICAL DIRECTION. GIVEN THAT MOST MOTION INVOLVES AN INTEGRATION OF BOTH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL FORCE PRODUCTION, TRANSFERENCE OF GYM-BASED STRENGTH GAINS MAY BE IMPROVED IF EXERCISES WERE USED THAT INVOLVED BOTH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL FORCE PRODUCTION.

Author Information

1Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand; and 2School of Environmental, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Aaron D. Randell

is a doctoral student in Strength and Conditioning at AUT University.

John Cronin

is a professor in Strength and Conditioning at AUT University and holds an adjunct professor position at Edith Cowan University.

Justin Keogh

is a senior lecturer in Biomechanics and Physical Conditioning at AUT University.

Nicholas Gill

is the strength and conditioning coach for All Blacks rugby team.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association