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Transference of Strength and Power Adaptation to Sports PerformanceHorizontal and Vertical Force Production

Randell, Aaron D MSc1; Cronin, John B PhD1,2; Keogh, Justin W L PhD1; Gill, Nicholas D PhD1

Strength & Conditioning Journal: August 2010 - Volume 32 - Issue 4 - pp 100-106
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181e91eec
Article

THE TRAINING OF HORIZONTAL PROPULSIVE FORCE GENERATION IS ONE ASPECT OF MANY SPORTS THAT IS NOT EASILY SIMULATED WITH TRADITIONAL GYM-BASED RESISTANCE TRAINING METHODS, WHICH PRINCIPALLY WORK THE LEG MUSCULATURE IN A VERTICAL DIRECTION. GIVEN THAT MOST MOTION INVOLVES AN INTEGRATION OF BOTH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL FORCE PRODUCTION, TRANSFERENCE OF GYM-BASED STRENGTH GAINS MAY BE IMPROVED IF EXERCISES WERE USED THAT INVOLVED BOTH VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL FORCE PRODUCTION.

1Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand; and 2School of Environmental, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Aaron D. Randell

is a doctoral student in Strength and Conditioning at AUT University.

John Cronin

is a professor in Strength and Conditioning at AUT University and holds an adjunct professor position at Edith Cowan University.

Justin Keogh

is a senior lecturer in Biomechanics and Physical Conditioning at AUT University.

Nicholas Gill

is the strength and conditioning coach for All Blacks rugby team.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association