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Power Development Through Complex Training for The Division I Collegiate Athlete

May, Courtney A MS, CSCS, NSCA-CPT1; Cipriani, Daniel PT, PhD2; Lorenz, Kent A MS, CSCS, NSCA-CPT2

Strength & Conditioning Journal:
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181dd8f47
Article
Abstract

SPORTS REQUIRING EXPLOSIVE MOVEMENTS REQUIRE POWER PRODUCTION. A STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PROGRAM SHOULD CONSIST OF EXERCISES THAT WILL PROMOTE POWER DEVELOPMENT IN THE ATHLETE. POWER CAN BE DEFINED AS THE PRODUCT OF A FORCE AND VELOCITY, WHICH CAN BE TRAINED AND INCREASED THROUGH RESISTED AND PLYOMETRIC MOVEMENTS. COMPLEX TRAINING CAN BE USED IN FORCE DEVELOPMENT AND YIELDS AN INCREASE IN POWER. THE PUBLISHED LITERATURE ON COMPLEX TRAINING DOES NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE PRACTICES OF COMPLEX TRAINING IN THE WEIGHT ROOM. THIS ARTICLE'S PURPOSE IS TO COMPARE THE SUGGESTIONS FROM THE LITERATURE AND STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING COACHES IN A PRACTICAL SETTING.

Author Information

1Warfighter Performance Department, Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, California; and 2School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Courtney A. May

is a research scientist at the Naval Health Research Center.

Daniel Cipriani

is an associate professor in Biomechanics in the Department of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University.

Kent A. Lorenz

an exercise physiologist in the Department of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association