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Core Training: Evidence Translating to Better Performance and Injury Prevention

McGill, Stuart PhD

Strength & Conditioning Journal: June 2010 - Volume 32 - Issue 3 - pp 33-46
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181df4521
Article

THIS REVIEW ARTICLE RECOGNIZES THE UNIQUE FUNCTION OF THE CORE MUSCULATURE. IN MANY REAL LIFE ACTIVITIES, THESE MUSCLES ACT TO STIFFEN THE TORSO AND FUNCTION PRIMARILY TO PREVENT MOTION. THIS IS A FUNDAMENTALLY DIFFERENT FUNCTION FROM THOSE MUSCLES OF THE LIMBS, WHICH CREATE MOTION. BY STIFFENING THE TORSO, POWER GENERATED AT THE HIPS IS TRANSMITTED MORE EFFECTIVELY BY THE CORE. RECOGNIZING THIS UNIQUENESS, IMPLICATIONS FOR EXERCISE PROGRAM DESIGN ARE DISCUSSED USING PROGRESSIONS BEGINNING WITH CORRECTIVE AND THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES THROUGH STABILITY/MOBILITY, ENDURANCE, STRENGTH AND POWER STAGES, TO ASSIST THE PERSONAL TRAINER WITH A BROAD SPECTRUM OF CLIENTS.

Spine Biomechanics, Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Stuart McGill is a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association