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Heat and Hydration Considerations for Junior and Collegiate Tennis Players

Johnson, Evan C MA1; Armstrong, Lawrence E PhD2

Strength & Conditioning Journal: August 2009 - Volume 31 - Issue 4 - p 27-34
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e3181aedff2
Article

HEAT AND HYDRATION MAY NOT BE THE FIRST CONSIDERATIONS OF TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS, COACHES, AND ATHLETES, WHEN PREPARING FOR TENNIS. HOWEVER, HEALTH RISKS AND PERFORMANCE DECREMENTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH BOTH. THE DEMANDS OF TENNIS, PARTICULARLY DURING MULTI-DAY TOURNAMENTS, PREDISPOSE PLAYERS TO INCREASED CORE BODY TEMPERATURE AND LARGE FLUID LOSSES. THIS COMBINATION OF FACTORS CAN LEAD TO DECREASED PERFORMANCE AND EXERTIONAL HEAT ILLNESSES SUCH AS HEAT CRAMPS, HEAT SYNCOPE, OR HEAT EXHAUSTION. BY IDENTIFYING INDIVIDUAL FLUID AND SALT NEEDS, DESIGNING A REPLACEMENT PLAN, AND REDUCING CORE BODY TEMPERATURE DURING AND BETWEEN MATCHES, ATHLETES CAN OPTIMIZE PERFORMANCE WHILE MINIMIZING RISK OF HEAT ILLNESS.

1Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, California; and 2Department of Kinesiology, Exercise and Environmental Physiology at the Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

Evan Johnsonis a research scientist currently working at the Naval Health Research Center.

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Lawrence E. Armstrongis a professor of Exercise and Environmental Physiology at the Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut.

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© 2009 National Strength and Conditioning Association