Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Share this article on:

Training Considerations after Hamstring Injury in Athletes

Comfort, Paul MSc, CSCS1; Green, Carly M BSc, CSCS2; Matthews, Martyn MSc, CSCS1

Strength & Conditioning Journal: February 2009 - Volume 31 - Issue 1 - p 68-74
doi: 10.1519/SSC.0b013e318195d225
Articles

HAMSTRING STRAINS ARE COMPOUNDED BY A HIGH RECURRENCE RATE OF 12-31% WITHIN THE FIRST YEAR OF RETURN TO SPORT. EXPLANATIONS INCLUDE REDUCED TENSILE STRENGTH, REDUCED STRENGTH OF MUSCLE AND SURROUNDING SITES, AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY OF THE MUSCLE TENDON UNIT. STRETCHING ALONE IS INSUFFICIENT FOR COMPLETE REHABILITATION, RESULTING IN A RECURRENCE RATE AS HIGH AS 54.5% WITHIN 2 WEEKS OF RETURN TO SPORT. SPORT-SPECIFIC EXERCISE HAS BEEN SHOWN TO BE MORE SUCCESSFUL. FOR COMPLETE REHABILITATION OF HAMSTRING STRAIN, THE INCLUSION OF ECCENTRIC PLYOMETRIC EXERCISE AND SPORT SPECIFIC DRILLS AT THE APPROPRIATE TIME IS ESSENTIAL.

1University of Salford, Greater Manchester; and 2Sports Injury Specialist Clinic, Essex, United Kingdom

Paul Comfort is a lecturer and strength and conditioning coach at University of Salford.

Figure

Figure

Carly Green is graduate sports rehabilitator, strength and conditioning coach and founder of the Sports Injury Specialist Clinic.

Figure

Figure

Martyn Matthews is a senior lecturer and strength and conditioning coach at University of Salford.

Figure

Figure

© 2009 National Strength and Conditioning Association