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Validation of a Video Analysis Software Package for Quantifying Movement Velocity in Resistance Exercises

Sañudo, Borja; Rueda, David; Pozo-Cruz, Borja del; de Hoyo, Moisés; Carrasco, Luis

Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: October 2016 - Volume 30 - Issue 10 - p 2934–2941
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000563
Original Research

Abstract: Sañudo, B, Rueda, D, del Pozo-Cruz, B, de Hoyo, M, and Carrasco, L. Validation of a video analysis software package for quantifying movement velocity in resistance exercises. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2934–2941, 2016—The aim of this study was to establish the validity of a video analysis software package in measuring mean propulsive velocity (MPV) and the maximal velocity during bench press. Twenty-one healthy males (21 ± 1 year) with weight training experience were recruited, and the MPV and the maximal velocity of the concentric phase (Vmax) were compared with a linear position transducer system during a standard bench press exercise. Participants performed a 1 repetition maximum test using the supine bench press exercise. The testing procedures involved the simultaneous assessment of bench press propulsive velocity using 2 kinematic (linear position transducer and semi-automated tracking software) systems. High Pearson's correlation coefficients for MPV and Vmax between both devices (r = 0.473 to 0.993) were observed. The intraclass correlation coefficients for barbell velocity data and the kinematic data obtained from video analysis were high (>0.79). In addition, the low coefficients of variation indicate that measurements had low variability. Finally, Bland-Altman plots with the limits of agreement of the MPV and Vmax with different loads showed a negative trend, which indicated that the video analysis had higher values than the linear transducer. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that the software used for the video analysis was an easy to use and cost-effective tool with a very high degree of concurrent validity. This software can be used to evaluate changes in velocity of training load in resistance training, which may be important for the prescription and monitoring of training programmes.

Department of Physical Education and Sport, University of Seville, Seville, Spain

Address correspondence to Borja Sañudo, bsancor@us.es.

Copyright © 2016 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.