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Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31829b26ce
Original Research

Neurocognitive Responses to a Single Session of Static Squats With Whole Body Vibration

Amonette, William E.1; Boyle, Mandy1; Psarakis, Maria B.1; Barker, Jennifer1; Dupler, Terry L.1; Ott, Summer D.2,3

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Abstract: Amonette, WE, Boyle, M, Psarakis, MB, Barker, J, Dupler, TL, and Ott, SD. Neurocognitive responses to a single session of static squats with whole body vibration. J Strength Cond Res 29(1): 96–100, 2015—The purpose of this study was to determine if the head accelerations using a common whole body vibration (WBV) exercise protocol acutely reduced neurocognition in healthy subjects. Second, we investigated differential responses to WBV plates with 2 different delivery mechanisms: vertical and rotational vibrations. Twelve healthy subjects (N = 12) volunteered and completed a baseline (BASE) neurocognitive assessment: the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). Subjects then participated in 3 randomized exercise sessions separated by no more than 2 weeks. The exercise sessions consisted of five 2-minute sets of static hip-width stance squats, with the knees positioned at a 45° angle of flexion. The squats were performed with no vibration (control [CON]), with a vertically vibrating plate (vertical vibration [VV]), and with a rotational vibrating plate (rotational vibration [RV]) set to 30 Hz with 4 mm of peak-to-peak displacement. The ImPACT assessments were completed immediately after each exercise session and the composite score for 5 cognitive domains was analyzed: verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, and impulse control. Verbal memory scores were unaffected by exercise with or without vibration (p = 0.40). Likewise, visual memory was not different (p = 0.14) after CON, VV, or RV. Significant differences were detected for visual motor speed (p = 0.006); VV was elevated compared with BASE (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences (p = 0.26) in reaction time or impulse control (p = 0.16) after exercise with or without vibration. In healthy individuals, 10 minutes of 30 Hz, 4-mm peak-to-peak displacement vibration exposure with a 45° angle of knee flexion did not negatively affect neurocognition.

Copyright © 2015 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.



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