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Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000552
Original Investigation: PDF Only

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELECTED STRENGTH AND POWER ASSESSMENTS TO PEAK AND AVERAGE VELOCITY OF THE DRIVE BLOCK IN OFFENSIVE LINE PLAY.

Jacobson, Bert H.; Conchola, Eric; Smith, Doug B.; Akehi, Kazuma; Glass, Rob

Published Ahead-of-Print
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Abstract

Typical strength training for football includes the squat and power clean and routinely measured variables include 1-RM squat and 1-RM power clean along with the vertical jump for power. However, little research exists regarding the association between the strength exercises and velocity of an actual on-the field performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of peak velocity (PV) and average velocity (AV) of the offensive line drive block to 1-RM squat, 1-RM power clean (PC), the vertical jump (VJ), body mass, and body composition. 1-RM assessments for the squat and PC were recorded along with VJ height, body mass and percent body fat. These data were correlated with PV and AV while performing the drive block. Peal velocity and AV were assessed using a Tendo(R) Power and Speed Analyzer as the linemen fired, from a three-point stance, into a stationary blocking dummy. Pearson Product analysis yielded significant (P<0.05) correlations between PV and AV and the VJ, the squat, and the PC. A significant inverse association was found for both PV and AV and body fat. These data help to confirm that the typical exercises recommended for American football linemen is positively associated with both PV and AV needed for the drive block effectiveness. It is recommended that these exercises remain the focus of a weight room protocol and that ancillary exercises be built around these exercises. Additionally, efforts to reduce body fat are recommended.

Copyright (C) 2014 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.

 

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