Skip Navigation LinksHome > February 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 2 > Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Level 1...
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31829b2ac4
Original Research

Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Level 1 Movement Screens and Golf Swing Faults

Gulgin, Heather R.; Schulte, Brian C.; Crawley, Amy A.

Collapse Box

Abstract

Gulgin, HR, Schulte, BC, and Crawley, AA. Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screens and golf swing faults. J Strength Cond Res 28(2): 534–539, 2014—Although some research in the past has examined how physical limitations in strength or flexibility affect a golfer's performance, the performance outcome most measured was driving distance. Currently, there are no data that have examined the relationship between selected strength and flexibility variables and golf swing faults. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screen variables and 14 common golf swing faults. Thirty-six male and female golfers (mean age, 25.4 ± 9.9 years; height, 175.9 ± 16.2 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 14.6 kg; handicap, 14.2 ± 10.4) participated. Twelve physical tests of strength, flexibility, and balance were assessed using the TPI level 1 golf fitness screening tool. Golfers then hit 4 golf shots (with a 5-iron) while being videoed, and those were then analyzed for 14 different golf swing faults (using V1Pro software). Three significant associations between a physical limitation and a particular golf swing fault were found: toe touch and early hip extension (p = 0.015), bridge on right side with both early hip extension (p = 0.050), and loss of posture (p = 0.028). In addition, an odds ratio showed that when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on left side, they were 2–3 times more likely to exhibit a early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing, as compared with those who could perform a correct overhead deep squat. Based on our findings, it is important for the golf fitness professional to particularly address a golfer's core strength, balance, and hamstring flexibility to help avoid common golf swing faults, which affect a golfer's ball striking ability and ultimately their performance.

© 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association

 

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.