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Effectiveness of Different Postactivation Potentiation Protocols With and Without Whole Body Vibration on Jumping Performance in College Athletes

Naclerio, Fernando1; Faigenbaum, Avery D.2; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko3; Ratamess, Nicholas A.2; Kang, Jie2; Friedman, Paul2; Ross, Ryan E.2

Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: January 2014 - Volume 28 - Issue 1 - p 232–239
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318295d7fb
Original Research

Abstract: Naclerio, F, Faigenbaum, AD, Larumbe-Zabala, E, Ratamess, NA, Kang, J, Friedman, P, and Ross, RE. Effectiveness of different postactivation potentiation protocols with and without whole body vibration on jumping performance in college athletes. J Strength Cond Res 28(1): 232–239, 2014—This study examined the acute effects of different parallel squat postactivation potentiation protocols with and without whole body vibration on jumping performance in college athletes. Fifteen men (20.3 ± 1.3 years, 179.50 ± 5.3 cm, 81.0 ± 10.8 kg) performed 3 repetitions of a countermovement jump (CMJ) and best drop jump after 3 conditions: (a) parallel squat with 80% 1 repetition maximum without vibration (NV-PS), (b) parallel squat with 80% 1 repetition maximum on a whole body vibration platform (WBV-PS) (1.963-mm amplitude and 40 Hz), and (c) control (C). Each condition was performed under both low-volume (LV) (1 set of 3 repetitions) and high-volume (HV) (3 sets of 3 repetitions) protocols that were followed by both 1- and 4-minute rest periods. Significant improvements were observed for the CMJ height (p = 0.005) after 4 minutes of recovery and the LV protocol (p = 0.015) regardless of the condition. Additionally, for the WBV-PS condition, a significantly lower drop jump height was observed after 1 minute (p = 0.0022) after both low (p = 0.022) and HV (0.010) protocols. In conclusion, 4 minutes of recovery was adequate for improving CMJ height after an LV protocol regardless of the condition and restoring drop jump height performance after WBV-PS regardless of the protocol in male college athletes.

1Centre of Sports Sciences and Human Performance, School of Sciences, Greenwich University, United Kingdom;

2Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey; and

3Department of Motor and Training, European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Address correspondence to Fernando Naclerio, e-mail: f.j.naclerio@gre.ac.uk.

Copyright © 2014 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.