Skip Navigation LinksHome > November 2013 - Volume 27 - Issue 11 > Crossfit-Based High-Intensity Power Training Improves Maxima...
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318289e59f
Original Research

Crossfit-Based High-Intensity Power Training Improves Maximal Aerobic Fitness and Body Composition

Smith, Michael M.; Sommer, Allan J.; Starkoff, Brooke E.; Devor, Steven T.

Erratum

Erratum

In reference to Smith, MM, Sommer, AJ, Starkoff, BE, and Devor, ST. Crossfit-based high-intensity power training improves maximal aerobic fitness and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 27(11): 3159–3172, 2013, the authors have stated that the reasons for participants not completing follow-up testing, as reported in the article, were provided to the authors by the club owner. The club owner has denied that he provided this information.

After the article was published, 10 of the 11 participants who did not complete the study have provided their reasons for not finishing, with only 2 mentioning injury or health conditions that prevented them from completing follow-up testing.

In light of this information, injury rate should not be considered a factor in this study. This change does not affect the overall conclusion of the article.

The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 29(10):e1, October 2015.

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Abstract

Abstract: Smith, MM, Sommer, AJ, Starkoff, BE, and Devor, ST. Crossfit-based high-intensity power training improves maximal aerobic fitness and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 27(11): 3159–3172, 2013—The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a crossfit-based high-intensity power training (HIPT) program on aerobic fitness and body composition. Healthy subjects of both genders (23 men, 20 women) spanning all levels of aerobic fitness and body composition completed 10 weeks of HIPT consisting of lifts such as the squat, deadlift, clean, snatch, and overhead press performed as quickly as possible. Additionally, this crossfit-based HIPT program included skill work for the improvement of traditional Olympic lifts and selected gymnastic exercises. Body fat percentage was estimated using whole-body plethysmography, and maximal aerobic capacity (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max) was measured by analyzing expired gasses during a Bruce protocol maximal graded treadmill test. These variables were measured again after 10 weeks of training and compared for significant changes using a paired t-test. Results showed significant (p < 0.05) improvements of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in men (43.10 ± 1.40 to 48.96 ± 1.42 ml·kg−1·min−1) and women (35.98 ± 1.60 to 40.22 ± 1.62 ml·kg−1·min−1) and decreased body fat percentage in men (22.2 ± 1.3 to 18.0 ± 1.3) and women (26.6 ± 2.0 to 23.2 ± 2.0). These improvements were significant across all levels of initial fitness. Significant correlations between absolute oxygen consumption and oxygen consumption relative to body weight was found in both men (r = 0.83, p < 0.001) and women (r = 0.94, p < 0.001), indicating that HIPT improved V[Combining Dot Above]O2max scaled to body weight independent of changes to body composition. Our data show that HIPT significantly improves V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and body composition in subjects of both genders across all levels of fitness.

Copyright © 2013 by the National Strength & Conditioning Association.

 

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