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After-School Fitness Performance is Not Altered After Physical Education Lessons in Adolescent Athletes

Faigenbaum, Avery D1; McFarland, James E2; Buchanan, Erin1; Ratamess, Nicholas A1; Kang, Jie1; Hoffman, Jay R1

Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: March 2010 - Volume 24 - Issue 3 - pp 765-770
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181c7c2b2
Original Research

Faigenbaum, AD, McFarland, JE, Buchanan, E, Ratamess, NA, Kang, J, and Hoffman, JR. After-school fitness performance is not altered after physical education lessons in adolescent athletes. J Strength Cond Res 24(3): 765-770, 2010-Physical education (PE) provides a unique opportunity for school-age youth to establish health habits, although some young athletes are exempt from PE and others do not participate because of a concern regarding the lingering effects of fatigue on after-school fitness performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of different PE lessons on after-school fitness performance in young athletes. Twenty athletes (14-18 years) participated in 3 different PE lessons that consisted of aerobic exercise (AE), resistance training (RT), or basketball skill training (BS). Fitness performance was assessed after-school following each lesson and after a control day without PE. There were no significant differences in flexibility (34.1 ± 6.5, 34.7 ± 1.3, 33.5 ± 7.2, and 33.6 ± 7.3 cm), vertical jump (46.3 ± 14.7, 46.2 ± 13.6, 46.4 ± 13.4, and 45.6 ± 14.2 cm), long jump (175.0 ± 36.4, 174.2 ± 36.3, 172.7 ± 35.8, and 171.9 ± 34.7 cm), medicine ball toss (348.9 ± 121.8, 342.0 ± 120.6, 353.9 ± 123.6, and 348.4 ± 129.1 cm), proagility shuttle run (5.8 ± 0.5, 5.7 ±0.53, 5.8 ± 0.52, and 5.8 ± 0.5 seconds), 20-m sprint (3.7 ± 0.4, 3.7 ± 0.4, 3.7 ± 0.3, and 3.7 ± 0.3 seconds), and 200-m sprint (36.3 ± 4.7, 35.1 ± 4.0, 35.9 ± 5.9, and 35.4 ± 5.4 seconds) after AE, RT, BS, or the control day, respectively. These findings suggest that an exercise lesson or skill-based PE class will not have an adverse effect on after-school fitness performance in adolescent athletes.

1Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey; and 2Department of Physical Education, Hillsborough High School, Hillsborough, New Jersey

Address correspondence to Avery D. Faigenbaum, faigenba@tcnj.edu.

© 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association