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Familiarization Indexes in Sessions of 1-RM Tests in Adult Women

Soares-Caldeira, Lúcio Flávio1,2; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes3; Okuno, Nilo Massaru1; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni3; Gurjão, Andre Luiz Demantova3; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori Lynn4

Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181b3e158
Original Research
Abstract

Soares-Caldeira, LF, Ritti-Dias, RM, Okuno, NM, Cyrino, ES, Gurjão, ALD, and Ploutz-Snyder, LL. Familiarization indexes in sessions of 1-RM tests in adult women. J Strength Cond Res 23(7): 2039-2045, 2009-The objective of this study was to evaluate the familiarization to the 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) test in adult women with previous experience in resistance training and to compare the statistical methods to analyze familiarization. Twenty-seven women, with previous experience in resistance training but detrained for 6 months, participated in the study (21.6 ± 2.5 years; 59.1 ± 6.7 kg; 1.65 ± 0.04 m; 21.8 ± 2.4 kg/m2). The 1-RM test was used to verify the strength levels in 3 exercises: bench press, squat, and arm curl. Five 1-RM tests sessions were performed in distinct days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman plotting procedures were used to compare the 1-RM load between the familiarization sessions. The significance assumed was p < 0.05. All exercises presented good ICC between 1-RM familiarization sessions (0.97-0.98). However, there were significant increases in 1-RM load among the 5 sessions of 1-RM tests in the bench press (+5.7%), squat (+5.4%), and arm curl (+11.1%). In addition, there were different responses according to the statistical analyses used (ANOVA, higher 1-RM strength, and Bland-Altman plotting). The results of the present study suggest that familiarization sessions are important for an accurate assessment of 1-RM load even in subjects with previous experience in resistance training.

Author Information

1Physiological Adaptations to Training Research Group, Sport and Physical Education Center, Londrina State University (UEL), Londrina, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Physical Education, North University of Paraná (UNOPAR), Londrina, Paraná, Brazil; 3Metabolism, Nutrition, and Exercise Research Group, Sport and Physical Education Center, Londrina State University (UEL), Londrina, Paraná, Brazil; and 4Departmnet of Exercise Science, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, United States

Address correspondence to Lúcio Flávio Soares Caldeira, luciocaldeira@yahoo.com.br.

© 2009 National Strength and Conditioning Association