Skip Navigation LinksHome > August 2009 - Volume 23 - Issue 5 > Relationship of 1 Repetition Maximum Lat-Pull to Pull-Up and...
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181b338ec
Original Research

Relationship of 1 Repetition Maximum Lat-Pull to Pull-Up and Lat-Pull Repetitions in Elite Collegiate Women Swimmers

Halet, Kristin A1; Mayhew, Jerry L1,2; Murphy, Colleen3; Fanthorpe, Joe3

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Abstract

Halet, KA, Mayhew, JL, Murphy, C, and Fanthorpe, J. Relationship of 1 repetition maximum lat-pull to pull-up and lat-pull repetitions in elite collegiate women swimmers. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): 1496-1502, 2009-The purposes of this study were to determine the relationships among pull-ups, lat-pull repetitions, and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) lat-pull in elite women swimmers and to assess the effect of various anthropometric dimensions on each exercise. Women members (n = 28) of an elite National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II swim team were measured for their ability to perform a maximum number of free-hanging pull-ups, 1RM lat-pull, and lat-pull repetitions at 80% of 1RM. Anthropometric dimensions included selected arm lengths, percent body fat (%fat), and lean body mass (LBM) estimated from skinfold measurements. The correlations of 1RM lat-pull with body mass (r = 0.38, p = 0.04) and LBM (r = 0.41, p = 0.03) were significant, whereas that with %fat (r = 0.13, p = 0.49) was not. The same variables had a significant negative pattern with pull-ups (r = −0.48, −0.43, −0.32, respectively). Pull-ups were moderately correlated with 1RM lat-pull (r = 0.34, p = 0.08) but not with lat-pull repetitions (r = 0.07, p = 0.73). The product of pull-ups times body mass (PU × BM) was a better predictor of 1RM lat-pull (r = 0.86, standard errors of estimate [SEEs] = 4.4 kg) than either measurement alone. The addition of %fat to PU × BM in a stepwise regression analysis raised the correlation (R = 0.90) and reduced the SEE (3.9 kg) only slightly. Addition of arm or forearm lengths failed to increase the multiple R significantly. These results confirmed that the seemingly analogous exercises of pull-ups and lat-pulls were not highly related and should not be substituted for one another in a training regimen.

© 2009 National Strength and Conditioning Association

 

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