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AGE AND SEX DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECT REGIONAL CHANGES IN ONE REPETITION MAXIMUM STRENGTH.

LEMMER, JEFFREY T.; MARTEL, GREGORY F.; HURLBUT, DIANE E.; HURLEY, BEN F.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: August 2007
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

To assess the influences of age and sex on regional changes in 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength, 10 young men (20-30 years), 8 young women (20-30 years), 11 older men (65-75 years), and 10 older women (65-75 years) were studied before and after a 24-week whole-body strength training program. Changes in 1RM strength were analyzed for each individual exercise, as well as by calculating a total body score (TBS), an upper body score (UBS), and a lower body score (LBS). The effect of age and sex on changes in 1RM strength was analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. When changes in strength for individual exercises were analyzed, the chest press, lat pulldown, shoulder press, and triceps pushdown were affected by both age (p > 0.05) and sex (p > 0.05), while the biceps curls were only influenced by age (p > 0.05). For the lower body, the leg press changes in 1RM strength were influenced by age (p > 0.0001), while leg extension was influenced by sex (p > 0.05). Total body score, UBS, and LBS showed significant increases with 24 weeks of ST (p > 0.001, all). Changes in TBS and UBS were affected by age (p > 0.001, both) and sex (p > 0.05 and p > 0.001, respectively). Younger subjects showed a greater increase in strength than older subjects, and men showed a greater increase in strength compared with women. Changes in LBS were affected by age (p > 0.001), with younger subjects showing a greater increase in strength compared with the older subjects, but not by sex (p = 0.464). These data indicate that regional increases in strength are differentially affected by age and sex.

(C) 2007 National Strength and Conditioning Association