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EFFECT OF SHORT-TERM EQUAL-VOLUME RESISTANCE TRAINING WITH DIFFERENT WORKOUT FREQUENCY ON MUSCLE MASS AND STRENGTH IN UNTRAINED MEN AND WOMEN.

CANDOW, DARREN G.; BURKE, DARREN G.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: February 2007
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

Changes in muscle mass and strength will vary, depending on the volume and frequency of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of short-term equal-volume resistance training with different workout frequency on lean tissue mass and muscle strength. Twenty-nine untrained volunteers (27-58 years; 23 women, 6 men) were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups: group 1 (n = 15; 12 women, 3 men) trained 2 times per week and performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions to fatigue for 9 exercises, group 2 (n = 14; 11 women, 3 men) trained 3 times per week and performed 2 sets of 10 repetitions to fatigue for 9 exercises. Prior to and following training, whole-body lean tissue mass (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry) and strength (1 repetition maximum squat and bench press) were measured. Both groups increased lean tissue mass (2.2%), squat strength (28%), and bench press strength (22-30%) with training (p < 0.05), with no other differences. These results suggest that the volume of resistance training may be more important than frequency in developing muscle mass and strength in men and women initiating a resistance training program.

(C) 2007 National Strength and Conditioning Association