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THE EFFECT OF ACUTE RESISTANCE EXERCISE ON SERUM MALONDIALDEHYDE IN RESISTANCE-TRAINED AND UNTRAINED COLLEGIATE MEN.

DIXON, CURT B.; ROBERTSON, ROBERT J.; GOSS, FREDRIC L.; TIMMER, JEFFREY M.; NAGLE, ELIZABETH F.; EVANS, RHOBERT W.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: August 2006
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

The purposes of this study were to determine whether acute resistance exercise increases serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels postexercise, and if so, whether resistance exercise training status influences the magnitude of the exercise-induced lipid peroxidation response. Twelve recreationally resistancetrained (RT) and 12 untrained (UT) men who did not have resistance exercise experience in the past year participated in this study. All subjects completed an 8-exercise circuit resistance exercise protocol consisting of 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 10 repetitions maximum for each exercise. Blood samples were obtained pre-exercise, at 5 minutes postexercise, and at 6, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. At pre-exercise, MDA (nmol[middle dot]ml-1) averaged 3.41 +/- 0.25 (RT) and 3.20 +/- 0.25 (UT) and did not differ (p > 0.05) either between groups or over time. Creatine kinase (IU[middle dot]L-1) was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated 5 minutes post-exercise (170.6 +/- 25.8), 6 hours postexercise (290.3 +/- 34.4), 24 hours postexercise (365.5 +/- 49.9), and 48 hours postexercise (247.5 +/- 38.5) as compared with pre-exercise (126.4 +/- 20.2) for both groups. There was no difference (p < 0.05) in CK activity between groups. This study indicated that moderate-intensity whole-body resistance exercise had no effect on serum MDA concentration in RT and UT subjects.

(C) 2006 National Strength and Conditioning Association