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Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

PEAK FORCE AND RATE OF FORCE DEVELOPMENT DURING ISOMETRIC AND DYNAMIC MID-THIGH CLEAN PULLS PERFORMED AT VARIOUS INTENSITIES.

KAWAMORI, NAOKI; ROSSI, STEVEN J.; JUSTICE, BLAKE D.; HAFF, ERIN E.; PISTILLI, EMIDO E.; O'BRYANT, HAROLD S.; STONE, MICHAEL H.; HAFF, G. GREGORY

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Abstract

Eight male collegiate weightlifters (age: 21.2 +/- 0.9 years; height: 177.6 +/- 2.3 cm; and body mass: 85.1 +/- 3.3 kg) participated in this study to compare isometric to dynamic force-time dependent variables. Subjects performed the isometric and dynamic mid-thigh clean pulls at 30-120% of their one repetition maximum (1RM) power clean (118.4 +/- 5.5 kg) on a 61 X 121.9-cm AMTI forceplate. Variables such as peak force (PF) and peak rate of force development (PRFD) were calculated and were compared between isometric and dynamic conditions. The relationships between force-time dependent variables and vertical jump performances also were examined. The data indicate that the isometric PF had no significant correlations with the dynamic PF against light loads. On the one hand, there was a general trend toward stronger relationships between the isometric and dynamic PF as the external load increased for dynamic muscle actions. On the other hand, the isometric and dynamic PRFD had no significant correlations regardless of the external load used for dynamic testing. In addition, the isometric PF and dynamic PRFD were shown to be strongly correlated with vertical jump performances, whereas the isometric PRFD and dynamic PF had no significant correlations with vertical jump performances. In conclusion, it appears that the isometric and dynamic measures of force-time curve characteristics represent relatively specific qualities, especially when dynamic testing involves small external loads. Additionally, the results suggest that athletes who possess greater isometric maximum strength and dynamic explosive strength tend to be able to jump higher.

(C) 2006 National Strength and Conditioning Association

 

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