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EFFECT OF MOVEMENT VELOCITY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRAINING LOAD AND THE NUMBER OF REPETITIONS OF BENCH PRESS.

SAKAMOTO, AKIHIRO; SINCLAIR, PETER J.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only
Abstract

This study investigated the effect of movement velocity on the relationship between loading intensity and the number of repetitions of bench press. Thirteen healthy men (age = 21.7 +/- 1.0 years; weight = 76.8 +/- 2.5 kg; 1 repetition maximum [1RM] = 99.5 +/- 6.0 kg), who were involved in regular weight training, voluntarily participated in the experiment. Subjects performed bench presses on a Smith machine at 5 different intensities (40-80% 1RM), repeated for 4 velocity conditions (slow: 0.15 +/- 0.03 m[middle dot]s-1; medium: 0.32 +/- 0.07 m[middle dot]s-1; fast: 0.52 +/- 0.12 m[middle dot]s-1; ballistic: maximum velocity), which were randomly assigned over 5 experimental sessions after a 1RM test. Velocity significantly changed the relationship between intensity (%1RM) and the number of reps performed (p < 0.001), with faster velocities producing a higher number of reps. A significant interaction between intensity and velocity meant that velocity had a much greater effect on repetitions at lower intensities. These results suggest that the benefits of using a stretch-shortening cycle during faster movements outweigh the associated disadvantages from the force-velocity relationship. The practical applications of this study are that, when trainees are assigned a resistance training with specific RM values, the lifted intensity (%1RM) or weights will not be consistent unless velocity is controlled during training.

(C) 2006 National Strength and Conditioning Association