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EFFECT OF ECCENTRIC STRENGTH TESTING ON DELAYED-ONSET MUSCLE PAIN.

DANNECKER, ERIN A.; O'CONNOR, PATRICK D.; ATCHISON, JAMES W.; ROBINSON, MICHAEL E.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: November 2005
ORIGINAL RESEARCH: PDF Only

Dannecker, E.A., P.D. O'Connor, J.W. Atchison, and M.E. Robinson. Effect of eccentric strength testing on delayedonset muscle pain. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(4):888-892. 2005.-This investigation was designed to determine the effect of eccentric strength testing on delayed-onset muscle pain in 20 untrained university students. Initially, eccentric strength testing (5-repetition maximum [5RM]) was performed bilaterally. Next, 1 arm completed 3 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions to induce delayed-onset muscle pain. Then, in a subsequent session, whichever arm previously performed only the 5RM test completed the 5RM test a second time and the 3 sets of 10 eccentric repetitions. Statistical analyses supported significantly increased pain intensity and unpleasantness across 48 hours post-5RM test alone. However, pain intensity and unpleasantness after the eccentric training bouts were significantly lower in the arm that performed 2 5RM tests than the arm that performed only 1. Thus, the eccentric strength testing produced delayed-onset muscle pain and protected against future delayed-onset muscle pain. These effects should be considered when such testing is used in baseline strength assessments.

(C) 2005 National Strength and Conditioning Association